2019-05-16_College Council

2019-05-16_College Council


>>Done. Okay. This is my kind of place. All right. Well, welcome, everyone. It’s May 16th, and
will be all day. That’s awesome. Okay. So I’m going
to call the meeting to order with my new glasses. Do we have a public
comment on non-agenda items? Okay. Hearing none, we’ll
move on to review and approval of the meeting notes
from April 25, 2019. I assume everybody’s
read them copiously. Okay. Do — isn’t that
— that’s a power word.>>That’s a, that’s a
very big power word.>>Thank you. Do I have a motion to approve?>>So moved.>>Second?>>Second.>>All right. Any discussion? Great. All in favor?>>Aye.>>Aye.>>Opposed? Extensions? All right, Mark [Inaudible]
was not here.>>I wasn’t here.>>All right. Excellent. Information items. Superintendent Cousins
[assumed spelling] update. I’m going to go quickly just
because we have a busy day. So, let’s see. Since we last were here,
as you know from my email, I walked the halls of Sacramento
with Jack Scott to try to get support for the Sarafian
[assumed spelling] Building. When the Governor’s
revise came out last week, it was not included in
the list, but that — apparently we did talk
to Portantino’s Office and they weren’t
surprised by that. Apparently the Governor
is thinking that the Legislature will
take care of that issue rather than the Governor weighing in. And so what we know right now
is that the Assembly side, the Assembly folks
have already voted and added our building
to the list. We met with folks
on the Senate side and Senator Portantino
is the Chair of the Appropriations
Committee, and he’s very much in favor of our building. We’ve also talked
to the Assembly and Senate Budget folks, the
folks who actually run those — that part of the Senate. And we’ve also talked
to somebody in the Governor’s Office. So it’s not possible for anybody
else to need to hear from us, because we have talked
to everyone. So hope springs eternal. And I think we’ve made a really
good argument for the building. In the Governor’s May Revise
is kind of okay news for us. I think, you know, you’ve
probably seen press releases out there — oh, isn’t
this a wonderful budget? Yes, well, kind of. Not really. Because the Student Center
funding formula is theoretically going to be fully funded, the problem is they didn’t
actually fully fund it for this year. So we’re hoping to get
money that is owed to us. We should have gotten an
additional $6 million. But instead, because of what
they’re calling I love you [inaudible] in the
state, the constraint TCR, or Total Computational Revenue, we actually are under
by 500,000. There’s some hope that we
might get some of that money by the end of the
year, but who knows? And I think — let’s see. Oh, June 14th, right? It’s on your dance
card, everyone. June 14th, 7 o’clock,
stadium, graduation. It’s going to be awesome and our
featured speaker is the artist Simone Silva, so it’s — I
think it’s going to be great, and I’m so looking
forward to it. It’s my first graduation. Any questions or comments? No? All right. So let’s move on to
Academic Affairs Update. Dr. Juney [assumed spelling].>>So I’m just going
to amend your update. You’re going to hire me
[laughter] because we are in hiring season and, obviously,
also starting award season. And so, if you all remember, we’re going out for
46 faculty positions. We actually have offered,
and when I see we, most student services
and instruction, we have offered a total of 27
positions so far, that have — the people have said yes. And as of last night’s
Board meeting, 14 of those people now have
become the April Board meeting and the May Board meeting have
been approved by the Board. So that means we’re
like 58% done, which is still a D [laughter].>>But when you think
about the amount of time.>>And just to add to
that — I mean, basically, I am in a meeting with our
new President at least twice, and almost every day [laughter].>>All right. It pays to be nice.>>We didn’t. We have two today, two
tomorrow, two on Monday. And so, hopefully by the end of
next week we’ll almost be there.>>Yeah.>>We do still have a few that will be a little
bit further out. We’ll also be increasing
the numbers because some of the early ones were — they’re double interviews
for single positions. And now we’re on the math
and English ones, and speech, where there’s multiple
positions. So we have to spend a little bit
more time together, but we ended up with greater [inaudible].>>But Armeena [inaudible],
my executive assistant, makes awesome Armenian coffee,
so that’s good [inaudible].>>Yes. That’s very, very true. And what I’ll also
say in that regard — I am really excited about
the caliber of people that we are offering jobs
to and who are accepting and who are very excited to
be joining the faculty here at Pasadena City College. So a lot of people
that we’re hiring, but it’s really a
great time, so.>>Yeah.>>Now we [inaudible].>>What about the dean position
that’s going to be vacant?>>There is a dean
position open right now that we’ll actually be putting
the Committee together shortly and starting the process. That’s the [inaudible] position. Is that the one you’re
asking about?>>Yeah.>>Yeah. Yeah. That one should actually
be closing shortly and the Committee
is being formed, and we’ll be having probably — we’ll probably be having
our first meeting next week to start basically putting
the timeline together and start the process. I’m not sure of the exact date that it closes, but
it’s shortly.>>Okay, wonderful. Student Affairs update.>>Dr. [Inaudible] is
in Sacramento this week.>>Oh, that’s right. A Consultation Council. [ Inaudible Speaker ] Oh, yes. I was going
to say that under that. So number four. This is our Administrative
Services update. We officially have a
Chief Business Officer. Yeah [applauding],
after four tries. It’s been a bumpy road,
but we were able to, when the last candidate search
number three had accepted the position and then at the last
minute decided to withdraw to take a different position
at a different college, I started — I got on the phone. We opened the position again
and I got on the phone, started making some phone
calls, and I’m very happy that somebody I used to
work with, Dr. Mike Bush at Oxnard College
came and applied. Went through the process. Actually, I think there
were 16 applications, so we did have a
pool after one week. We had a pool. There were interviews and then
I interviewed two finalists, and he was selected. He comes with a significant
amount of experience. He has been at Oxnard
College for seven years as the Chief Business Officer. And prior to that he was
the Assistant Superintendent at Fillmore Unified and
also at Santa Paul Unified. So he comes with a K-12
in Community College. He actually went to Occidental
College for his undergraduate and owned his first
house here in Pasadena. So he knows a lot
about the area. And exciting for us
since we are going to have a Culinary
Program at John Muir. His first career was as a chef. So he also is — he makes
a mean bread pudding. That’s all I’m going to say. And he brews beer, so, yeah!>>Cool.>>Dr. Juney and Dr. Bush will
have much to discuss [laughter]. They’re in the beer-brewing
process. So with that we’re going
to go on to old items. Discussion of possible action,
BPAP-3540, Sexual Assault, Second Rate, and we’ll
have [inaudible] Lazinski [assumed spelling].>>So this is the second time
in here and second time for most of you here regarding
this particular NP. So I’m looking for support
on — as it’s written. Although I have received
some comments from the Management Association
that Dr. [Inaudible] would like to discuss today. Or any other questions that
you may have has gone to most of all the other communities
to get to this point. And so, with that, [Inaudible]
I know you have some questions and I will give it to you and
I will try to explain some of the rationale behind —
well, before we do that, the nature of this
particular AP is centered around assaultive behavior
and the sexual violence. And that is what
is required for me to have counted [inaudible]
legislation that is quoted as its reference in this
first part of the references. So that is the reason
why we have carved out this particular AP
and have not watered it down to include other kinds
of sexual misconduct that, you know, is going to
mention [inaudible] today. So I just wanted you all to know that that’s the particular
reason why this is carved out, because sexual violence
is different and defined differently than
other sexual kinds of crimes and the process for
adjudicating those and processing those
are different, so that’s why we didn’t —
that’s why it is the way it is, and written as a carve out. So with that, Tito, I don’t want to take away any
of your steam –>>No.>>– but I know you
guys had some concerns. And so we can chat
about it if you like.>>Yes. At our last
business meeting of [inaudible] association,
we had a lot of discussion about all of our
APs and BPs listed. And this was one of them
that’s on the [inaudible] side. And we had a good
discussion with it. We have a lot of managers have
experience with this also, supporting students
in situations like this regarding misconduct. And they were facing
certain issues where they couldn’t
do anything about it because it wasn’t an assault. They used a key example of
a lewd act, again flashing, where we really couldn’t
do anything because it wasn’t an assault. There wasn’t actual
physical assault. So one of the things that
your managers mentioned, that in other areas where
she’d been at they have — it’s not just assault but on the
same policy it’s more a sexual misconduct, sexual
assault, and other assaults. It’s all listed under
one umbrella. And she did give examples that
as far as definition of it. Again, talking about — obviously without having
affirmative consent. There’s a lot of issues. Then I tried to get
— send it to Crystal but I did send it do Bob, about,
again, having no consensual sex, sexual content, or
attempts to commit the same. Again, listing this
under the AP, whereas the BP obviously
it is different, but it would still entail
changing some of that to include language
where it talks about nonsexual/sexual
contact, [inaudible] sensual, sensual contact, nonconsensual
sexual intercourse, sexual exploitation, and
different languages of that, that we want to see included
because, again, when you look at us so as Bob and
I were discussing in our [inaudible] it’s
illegal [inaudible]. And so it’s one that’s
commonly used. But when you talk
about misconduct, it’s not always included in
this, but there are institutions that do include them as
[inaudible] and we would like to see not really
them separate, more adding misconduct to this. That way it could have
a more stronger thing. And one of the things that
we also discussed while, yes, it was on the table as far as
just making it its own policy, but for folks here in
the know, again it’s even at the higher level when we’re
looking at it, it’s not in favor of having multiple policies that
kind of cover similar things, actually having it all in one. So MA is in favor
of editing this to include sexual misconduct.>>Just that word, but not –>>There’s –>>– subsequent
definitions of it.>>No. There’s — I mean –>>You want all of –>>We have additional language
[inaudible] give it to Crystal.>>Mark.>>I don’t know how
you could add that without having a specific
definition of sexual misconduct.>>Mm-hmm.>>What is sexual misconduct?>>I can read it for you
for this City of Los Angeles which is different than the City
of Sacramento which is different than the State of
Washington, right.>>Yeah, there is no
agreed upon definition.>>So when we talked about
the legal definition, I brought that. I figured this would come up. Sexual misconduct is not
one specific offense. And I think you know
that that — it’s a general term used to
refer to any sexual crime. While we especially hear the
phrase “sexual misconduct” in regard to [inaudible]
allegations, it can include many
different alleged sex crimes. So which is — so when — so the intent of this is sexual
violence, not sexual crimes. It’s the same thing, you know — it’s not calling it a
sexual harassment carve out which not necessarily
always a crime. It’s a violation of a policy. It can be a violation of a
law, but we carved that out because the process and
the penalties associated with sexual violence is much
different than it is for, in many cases, sexual
harassment, which is in the workplace. So that’s the reason why
there is the carve out. So the [inaudible] code
specifically says violence. And violence then is equated
to assaultive behavior. So that’s the reason why
this has been carved out. That’s the reason why the
[inaudible] has carved it out on purpose and
didn’t generalize it. And sexual misconduct is
actually a fairly new word or concept. It is something that
has evolved . So I don’t know if that — then
— and so I think when we talked about do we want to have a
more generalized policy — I would think that would
be the place to do that. I would not want to — this
is my — in my own opinion, water the intent of
this particular AP down. And then I think
we discussed that.>>Right. And not only
it would be watering it down [inaudible] going
to be covering it under a bigger umbrella
to include sexual — again, the assault pieces
would still be in place. We’d just be adding the
components of sexual misconduct.>>Mm-hmm.>>John, why don’t you tell us
— you’re part of the attorneys who wrote this mess, right? Right, right. I shared with you yesterday. Have them take a look. See what they think we can put
in and what we can take out.>>Yeah. I think that’s a good
idea, to have a legal opinion on this because what we want
to do is make sure that it’s — that the wording,
the definitions, are properly inclusive when
we need to draw upon them. But that they’re not so
expansive that something that — that it’s really just a
subjective interpretation of an action that — well, it
looks like it falls under here, so I would feel better
if we did have a legal –>>Yeah.>>– consult on that. Mm-hmm. So we can take that.>>Yes.>>And do you want
me to get a copy to everyone in this group then?>>Yeah, I think that would –>>To list it on Tito’s
email in case [inaudible].>>Yes, absolutely.>>I’ll now send it out to
this group then [inaudible].>>Okay. And then we’ll
send it to the attorney and see what they say.>>Yeah.>>Yes.>>Thank you.>>Okay. All right. Update on Management
appointments to Standing Committees. Tito.>>Yes. Something I
forgot to send to Crystal. But, yeah [laughter]. But this one — again, we
discussed this last week, and I think that attorney
and I had a conversation like I completely understand
where he’s coming from, especially again, as
mentioned, it’s — what I did preface by stating
that I wanted to make sure when I was talked with Dr.
[inaudible] the first time, it was more on the
wording before. There was many committees
that had [inaudible] with the President and she
felt like that was unneeded because it was kind
of repetitive because she has her appointees. And I jumped the gun and added for all the rest
where [inaudible]. But it was just for those. But now that we got there,
I had a good discussion with [inaudible] in favor
for the Calendar Committee. Actually, let me back up. For all the other
committees with the exception of the [inaudible] Committee and the Strategic
Planning Committee, it will read appointed by
Management Association. Whereas for the Calendar
Committee it will read appointed by the Vice President for
Instruction and Consultation with the Management Association. And then the Strategic
Planning is reverse. It will be appointed by
the Management Association in consultation with the VPI. So those will be the
only two changes. Again I’ve already emailed
it to [inaudible] just like with the [inaudible]. You’ll all get that one and
you’ll also get just some — they’re really — that’s the
only two changes to make sure that we are addressing
the constraint of the VPI which is very valuable. And that is all.>>Okay. Some good
clarification.>>Yes.>>Okay. Student Equity Plan. Dr. Makeola [assumed spelling]. Marris to my — did
I say that right?>>We practice a lot. [ Multiple Speakers ]>>Say that again, Tito. I like it when you say it. [ Speaking in Foreign Language ]>>There you go.>>Every day [inaudible].>>Yeah.>>So gracious about it.>>And I understand. [ Laughter ]>>Nice to be in good company.>>Yes, you’re [inaudible]. Great company.>>Yeah. But that’s why I
think it’s just easier –>>No, I can really, really. I can go somewhere else. [ Inaudible Speakers ]>>Exactly.>>Yeah. It would be –>>Quite, so much [inaudible].>>Why don’t you [inaudible]?>>Better than being
called Dr. Endrogenous which happens all the — [ Laughter ]>>Oh, dear.>>Oh, wow [laughter].>>Me [inaudible].>>It’s a [inaudible].>>Shellac. [ Laughter ] [ Multiple Speakers ]>>You know. Good morning, everyone. Thank you for having
me here this morning. I’m Michaela Mares
Tamayo [assumed spelling]. I’m accompanied by Dan Quinn
who’s one of our newest members to the PCC Family, and is a
Research Analyst specializing in Equity with the Office of
Institutional Effectiveness. And then, of course, Shelagh
Rose, who’s also a Co-Chair of our Student Success
Committee. And I always like to preface any
time I’m given the opportunity to do a presentation like this, the fact that I am also the
daughter of two PCC alumni, so my mom and my dad were
the first in their families to pursue higher
education, and they did so through Pasadena City College
and then went on to transfer to their respective bachelor
degree granting institutions. So I do sit here with
you as Dr. Mares Tamayo, very much in recognition of the
opportunities that were afforded to my family through this
education institution. And realizing it wasn’t just about their individual
experience but the impact it then had on
their community, our family, and kind of moving
out from there. So it’s in that same
spirit that I’m here to present what’s the collective
work of many of our colleagues on this campus which is our
2019/2022 Student Equity Plan. So just to give you an overview of what we’ll cover
this morning, I’ll share some background
on the Equity Plan and how it’s situated within
work that’s already going on at the College
and in the state. Then we’ll share a bird’s
eye-view of the data which is a really, really
large amount of information that we’ve been provided with
in a rather short timeframe, and so there’s a lot more
detail in the materials that were also forwarded to
you through the full plan. But we’ll kind of walk you
through some of the key points. And then also give
you an overview of our Equity Plan goals and the
next steps that we’ll be taking to achieve those goals,
and welcome any discussion, questions, comments at the end. Okay? So in terms
of some background. Every California Community
College must have an Equity Plan that covers from 2019 to
2022, share our current data on students’ experiences, and
then outlines how we are going to address and work
to close equity gaps of where students experience
disproportionate impact. So where they’re experiencing
less success in a given metric when compared to other groups. The due date for this
assignment is June 30, 2019. We received various
iterations of the data starting about March 1st, and so a
lot of credit to our Office of Institutional Effectiveness,
and this is where Dan and Crystal and our colleagues,
you know, Dustin and Khaleel and Peter, become very,
very important in helping us to understand what we
have in front of us. [Inaudible], and just
as a reminder, you know, we know that the Vision
for Success is sort of like the overarching kind
of guidance that we have from the Chancellor’s
Office in terms of the work that’s laid ahead of
us between — or up until 2027. Our local goals were really our
opportunity to sort of think about how are we going
to identify the progress that we want to make by the
time we reach the halfway point of that 10-year Vision for Success timeline
which is to 2022. And then our Equity Plan
is really, you know, aligned within these two other
efforts to think about how is that we’re specifically
going to focus resources and intentional actions
for supporting our students who are disproportionately
impacted. So when we look at the
data that we’re given from the Chancellor’s Office, we’re also given some very
specific instructions in terms of which student groups
we analyze or how we kind of slice and dice the data. And in essence, when we’re
looking at our Lancers, we’re looking at them
by race and ethnicity. And, of course, we desegregate
that into various groups. And then there are some groups
that are kept in aggregate. We look at current or former
foster youth, LGBT students, and this our newest
kind of data, element or availability that we have. So this is why it’s coming
up in this Equity Plan for the first time because
it previously wasn’t released to us by the state. We also look at SES or economically disadvantaged
students, students with disabilities,
and veterans. And then all of the above
groups are further desegregated into what are the current
Chancellor’s Office gender categories of female, male,
and all is inclusive of female, male, and then those who marked
not reported and/or unknown. And so I’ve not reported
unknown which is either that they didn’t identify with
the two gender binary categories that are currently provided, or
they just chose not to report, they didn’t want to report. So that having been said,
there are five metrics that we’re looking at in
this current Equity Plan. It’s different than
previous Equity Plans, and we’re looking
at them differently. We’ve been at, you know,
basically told to look at them a little bit
differently, but we’ll walk through what they are. So the first is Enrollment,
and that’s essentially for all those students
who marked on their application
via CCC Apply that they intended
to come here to PCC. How many of them actually
came, right, during ’17/’18. Retention is essentially
students who started with us in fall. How many came back
in the spring. And it excludes anybody who, you
know, graduated, transferred, achieved those kinds of goals. Transfer level math
and English refers to how many students
completed transfer level math and transfer level English within the first
year here at PCC. Completion is sort of
shorthand for those students who received a certificate
or degree. And then Transfer is all
those students who transferred to any type of bachelor
degree vending institution. So in state, out of
state, public, private. They’re all included
within this transfer metric, which is different
than our local goal. And so if it sounds a little
bit — if it sounds different — I won’t say [inaudible] — but if it sounds different from what you might
have heard previously, that’s because it is. And that’s essentially
the format that we’re being told
we have to work within. Okay? So when we look at those
five metrics we essentially are looking at a student
life cycle, right, the PCC student life cycle. So another way of representing
it is if we [inaudible] about the complete set of
experiences that we would like for out students
to have here, it starts with enrollment,
right? We want them to come here. Once they come here, we want
them to stay with retention. The next step would
be, you know, to encourage transfer level
math and English completion within the first year because
that sets them up for, you know, more successful goal
completion overall. Then certificate or degree
completion is the next step. After that and/or
transfer, right? And so we know that it’s not
a linear progression like that for all of our students
or even for us in our educational journeys, but
in sort of like a perfect world, that’s sort of the steps that they would lay
out chronologically. What we’re going to share
next is a bird’s eye view of our Equity Data, and
in particular showing where students are experiencing
disproportionate impact, and broken out by the groups
that they identify with. And so we’ll start off looking
at our two largest racial and ethnic groups that experience disproportionate
impact. The first one is our Black
or African American students, and so as we desegregate
by gender we see that Black African American
females are experience disproportionate [inaudible]
all five of the metrics. And so that’s represented by
the borders being, you know, kind of hashed out as opposed to
just sort of like a solid border and slightly lowered
in the visual to show that they’re experiencing a gap
between what would be, you know, kind of considered the
overall progression. For Black or African
American male students, they experienced
disproportionate impact in four of the metrics, all of the
metrics except for transfer. And when we look at the
aggregate of all Black or African American students, we again see disproportionate
impact across all five metrics. When we — I’m going back to,
again, the student life cycle. When we look at our Latino,
Latina, Latinx students who are currently, you know, about 51% of our
college population, Latina females are experiencing
disproportionate impact in enrollment and
transfer level math and English completion
in the first year. Latino males are experiencing
disproportionate impact in retention, transfer
level math and English, and in transfer. And then when we look at the
aggregate of all Latina, Latino, Latinx students, we see disproportionate
impact experienced in transfer level math and
English completion and transfer. So now we’re going to move
into the additional groups that we look at data for. And also understanding that
students who identify as Black, who identify as Latinx, are
also included in the groups that we’re now —
the identity markers that we’re now going
to be looking at. So students with disabilities,
those who identified as female experienced
disproportionate impact in transfer level math
and English, and transfer. The data shows that
male students with disabilities are also
experiencing disproportionate impact in transfer
level math and English and the same holds true when
we look at the aggregate for students with disabilities. When we look at our current
or former foster youth, those who identified as female, the data is showing
disproportionate impact in enrollment and transfer level
math and English completion. For our male foster youth,
[inaudible] former foster youth, they’re experiencing
disproportionate impact in retention and transfer level
math and English completion. And then when we look at
all foster youth students, they are experiencing
disproportionate impact in enrollment, retention,
and transfer level math and English completion
in the first hear.>>Hmph.>>When we look now at our LGBT
students, those who identified as female are experiencing
disproportionate impact in all of the metrics except
for enrollment. When we look at LGBT
male students, they experienced
disproportionate impact across all five metrics. And when we look at the
aggregate of all LGBT students, we again see disproportionate
impact across all five metrics. And then, finally, when we
look at our veteran students, we see disproportionate
impact experienced by males in retention and transfer level
math and English completion. Our data currently does
not show any equity gaps or substantive disproportionate
impact for female-identified
veteran students. But when we look at the
aggregate of all veterans, then we do see, again, a
disproportionate impact in retention and transfer
level math and English. Okay? So with that having been
said, again, when you look at the plan there is a copious
amount of data and there is, you know, a lot that we were
kind of working with in, particularly in the
Student Success Committee where we have our representation
from our faculty, our staff, our students, our managers. And what we wanted to do was we
wanted to be very purposeful. We didn’t feel comfortable doing like a one-size-fits-all
approach to goal-setting because,
again, we have so much data and we also really wanted
to think very carefully about what is the data showing
us, how do our goals align with our Vision for Success, and
local goal kind of a setting, how large the gaps are, how
large the student group is, what resources we may already
have available in place at the college, what things
we know are sort of coming down the pipeline or
have been in the works. There’s different centers
that are going to be opening. You know there’s a lot to
kind of take into account. So when it came time to
set those goals for — what we did was we set
very purposeful goals and informed goals looking
at our data and the trends and everything we were
taking into account for each group, for each metric. There are certain strategies,
though, that cut across all of those metrics and
for all of the groups, and we felt were important to
highlight because they allow us to be very intentional, but
also to have some flexibility to be responsive to our
students’ needs because, again, this is a plan that’s
covering for three years. We have to be, you know,
we have to understand that. So the first sort of
overarching strategies that cut across the — all of the
metrics and activities is to continue the work that
all of us here are involved in with institutional
transformation and consistent opportunities
for professional learnings that are equity-minded
and student-centered. The second strategy is to braid
existing and emerging resources to further establish the
impact of efforts that we see and have been engaged
in here at our college. The third is to engage
in inquiry and design to further strengthen
existing resources and services and determine where additional
innovations are needed. And then finally to
engage in inquiry to assess and evaluate the success of
coordinated support activities, so being very mindful of the
fact that we need students, we need staff, we need
faculty, we need managers to be working together and
really pause and have moments of reflection for what
it is that we’re doing and what progress we see that
we’re making or where we need to kind of like, you know, bump
things up a little bit or sort of tinker very mindfully. So that having been said,
that’s the overview of the plan. So any, you know, questions,
comments, thoughts, suggestions? I certainly welcome them and
our teamwork comes in right now.>>I have a question. I have an idea of how to
measure for these metrics. I’m not sure how an equity in a moment is manifested
or how it’s measured. Can you briefly touch on that?>>So that’s an excellent,
excellent question. And so the way that we’re
looking at that, that really — another thing I should
have mentioned, too — all of this also aligns very
much with Guided Pathways and what we’re just doing,
you know, as a state. And so one of the
first kind of pillars of Guided Pathways is
the idea of Guided Entry. And so what is it that
we’re doing to just sort of streamline the process
for students once they apply and they say that they do want
to come here, because there’s so many steps involved in that. There’s a lot of kind of just
like hidden curriculum involved in terms of knowing when
to go to what place, and who do you talk to, and
what are they giving you, and what are the follow-up kind
of things that you have to do. So I think one of —
you can interject. I have more to say,
but you guys –>>So it’s like we’re losing
people from the beginning point of filling out the application
to actually becoming — like getting you I.D. card.>>Yes.>>Okay.>>Yes.>>Okay.>>So that’s a loss point. Sometimes they get the I.D.
card but then they don’t sign up for classes or they
don’t know what classes to sign up for. Like there’s always different
pieces that come into it that — again, I think Guided Entry is
really trying to grapple with, and then also we’re trying to
put physical spaces in place. For example, when we have our
Welcome Center during the summer where that’s like a one-stop
kind of shop for getting a lot of those things done, but
also that information shared with students that help them
then to show up, you know, August 25th or whatever
it is, right? The classes actually
start, yeah.>>Thank you.>>We’re also talking about having much more
expanded registration support so students don’t really have
a space typically on campus where they can get assistance
with selecting the courses. The Library often
picks up the slack just because they have
those computers. But the librarians aren’t
necessarily trained in that. So between the Welcome Center and the establishing the First
Year Student Center we will have teams trained to help
them select the courses that will get them on
the path to completion.>>Sure. That will
make — I was just — I didn’t have an idea
what the base was. But it’s starting the
application essentially. And that may — now I get it.>>Good. Yeah. It’s completing the
application saying that you want to come to PCC.>>Right. And then
making sure that we –>>Actually –>>– can actually hear them. Thank you.>>Mm-hmm.>>So at this point, do we
need a motion to approve?>>Yes, please [laughter].>>A motion to approve.>>So moved.>>Do I have a second?>>Second.>>All right. So any discussion? I just want to say thank you. I know this has been a huge
heavy lift, and thank you so much for all of your
leadership, all of your work, and the work of everybody
who got us to this point. This is huge. So, thank you. Okay. With that,
all those in favor?>>Aye.>>Aye.>>Aye.>>Opposed? Abstentions? All righty. Well, we got us an Equity Plan. Yeah. Let me hear it. Equity Plan [inaudible]. Hoo.>>SCA. All right [inaudible]. Yes.>>What is [inaudible]?>>No. It can go on
the [inaudible] agenda. Whoo. Do 19. Do 19 [laughter]. Okay. New items discussion
and possible action. Standing committees that
are now currently meeting. Crystal.>>Yeah. I just wanted
to bring this up that our College Council
has standing committees for facilities and
sustainability and open safety and outcomes. None of these committees
have met. Facilities and Sustainability, Health and Safety have
not met in two years. Outcomes has not met this
year because [inaudible] new. I’m bringing this up because I
learned at the ACC JC Conference that if we have standing
committees or shared governance groups
that are not functioning or not working or
don’t meet our needs, we might want to
reconsider them.>>Mm-hmm. Well [inaudible].>>Yeah. So I would
definitely like to see –>>Sure.>>– in the fall
especially — I would — the reemergence of
the Facilities and Sustainability Committee,
especially as we’re looking at a Facilities Master Plan and
potentially going for a bond because my hope is that
some part of our attention to bond projects would
involve sustainability. And so I think that we should
get that started definitely.>>[Inaudible] going.>>And with that,
I remember we — I took a look at the guidelines. I know we voted [inaudible]
to combine those two. But it did have two
separate ones. So it isn’t even a smaller
committee that’s more, you know, focused. But also in the outcomes,
I remember Tara and I had this conversation
as well. It’s one of the only
committees, one that is new. Their membership is very
[inaudible] unlike any of the other committees, so I’m
not sure if they’re going to sit down and actually organize
that so it’s more cohesive with the rest of the standing
committees of College Council.>>I can probably answer
that question for you. The members of that committee
[inaudible] is rather intentionally based
on our outcome needs and the current sort
of challenges we face. But we do have to get some of the college-wide advertised
coordinated positions, for example, sorted out
before that can meet with any degree of confidence. So there are a couple
of extraneous issues that have prevented that
committee from meeting, but we need it desperately. And we need those
particular people on it because we can’t
have a conversation about institutional
outcomes, for example, without those people
in the room.>>Yeah.>>If I can just add — and so
when Tito and I were talking about that, it really,
it wasn’t an issue with the list of members. It was an issue of
the way it was listed because it was using a
different format than all of the other standing
committees. And so it just needs to be
reworded so that it looks like the other standing
committees in that regard. And then the other thing I
would add is that something that I can work with
as set an exact — in getting that going because,
obviously, we do need to have that committee up and running. So I’ll work with them going
on, making that happen.>>I also — and so I wasn’t
part of the conversation in regard to — you said that
there once was a Facilities and a Sustainability
Committee separate. I question why that’s together. I think that makes it difficult. I was involved in a
Sustainability Committee in a past life, and if our
Sustainability Committee is really doing what it should
do, that’s a huge task, and it shouldn’t be
link with Facilities because even though there are
some things that cross over, there’s a lot of
things that don’t.>>Okay. Well, I am — the reason I was looking at having those together
was efficiency of membership in case the same people
were interested in both. But I appreciate your comments
because I, too, was involved in that in a previous
life, and you’re right. The kinds of directions of the
Sustainability Committee — the kinds of issues that they
take up are not necessarily — the could take a Facilities
Committee off a track of trying to look at a big picture
rather than the sustainability. So at this point, what
happens when we have these? Do people articulate their
interest in being on them, or how do they get appointed?>>Well, since this
is your committee and these are your standing
committees, if you want them to still exist, I’ll
put out a call that they need to start meeting.>>Okay.>>Do you want to split
Facilities and Sustainability?>>Well, I — well I think we
should start out by splitting it and see if there’s a –>>Can I say –>>Yes.>>– let’s have a little bit
more conversation before we do that.>>Okay.>>I don’t — you know, I can guess at what the logic
was behind why that happened, but I don’t know for
sure if that happened. I think it would be helpful
because I have not looked at what this committee
is supposed to do. And so I would say,
before you make the — my recommendation to you is
before you say let’s split it –>>Okay.>>– let’s have a little bit
further conversation about that, and — because there
is a relationship –>>Okay.>>– and I hate to be the one
arguing for more committees –>>Yeah.>>Oh, no. I think that’s definitely
what you were doing. I think [laughter]
that’s your goal, yeah.>>We also have a
new CBO coming in.>>That’s true.>>So this may be
something you might –>>And this is something
that we could take up at our next [inaudible].>>Okay.>>Just like to bring
it to your attention.>>And then –>>I also want to make
it perfectly clear that even though I was talking
about the Sustainability and Facilities Committee,
and I was indicating that I had experience in
that, I am not indicating that the Vice President of Instruction should have
anything whatsoever –>>Well, I can appoint
you the Chair. [ Laughter ] And then the Health and
Safety, and that has not met for a long time I take it.>>Mm-hmm.>>Okay. I think that’s also
another one where we should talk to the incoming Chief
Business Officer because often those kinds of
issues are brought up through that chain, although there needs
to be an opportunity for anybody to bring — to highlight
health and safety issues. So that’s a — stay
tuned on that one.>>Okay.>>Okay. And then also Standing
Committee Annual Summaries and the [inaudible] Violation.>>Correct. I don’t — anybody who chairs
a standing committee will remember this. You have to write an annual
summary that gets posted on your Sure Governance Page
after your last meeting. It’s a summary of everything that you did throughout
the year, so if people just want a
quick look at what happened in that committee,
that there’s a summary. [Inaudible] for College Council. And then we have
a lot of others. So if everybody —
I’ll send out a notice that that needs to be done. And also, I will be sending out the end-of-year
Committee Evaluation probably within the next two weeks. So please take that. And that goes out to
the committee members for each standing committee.>>Okay. And then last,
accreditation as a standing item on governance agendas.>>[Inaudible] like
minority [inaudible].>>In the Accreditation Standing
Committee we discuss the idea of having accreditation listed
not only as a standing item, but also as a comment field
in the template that we used for our Shared Governance
Committees. Those agendas — yeah. So it would look
like that, that way. If there wasn’t an explicit
accreditation concern in the agenda itself, at the
very least that discussion of how the discussions
that are agenized overlap with accreditation
could be noted. And I figured it was
a good idea not just for shared governance agendas,
but all governance agendas on campus to have that
recommendation come out.>>And I would like to
speak in favor of this because we are 18
months, 19 months away from our next comprehensive ACC
JC visit, and one of the tasks that we have in front of us is
to ensure that everyone is aware about what’s happening
with accreditation. And this is a really great way
to make everyone aware that — and, ideally, it’s
an ongoing practice. It’s not just because
we’re 18 months away. It’s — we’re going to do
this 18 months and beyond because accreditation
is an ongoing concern. It’s not just because
we’re gearing up to a comprehensive visit, so.>>Conditionally enables
the campus community to understand how the
role that they play on committee relates
to accreditation.>>Yeah. Yeah. Fun, fun, fun. Here’s excitement. Here’s [inaudible]. It’s fun. We’re going
to have fun. I’m telling you. I believe in making
accreditation fun. Okay.>>Say again?>>Any announcements? Tito.>>After you all are done
having fun with the opening of the Truman Center,
from 12:00 to 1:00, Pat [inaudible] is hosting our
spring annual post-conference in Creveling Lounge. Because of the weather we had
to get out of the club so, of course, we [inaudible]. Nobody else saw David’s
email this morning. Student Health Center
was very cooperative in helping us with that. So they will be filming
the [inaudible] Hall, and we will now be
in Creveling Lounge. So if you want to
help either as a judge or just simply see [inaudible]
research, this [inaudible] mess around in the book
donations and other stories. We’d be more than happy
to have you present.>>Okay, wonderful.>>Okay. Anything else
for the good of the order?>>Yes. The Senate banquet where we will be celebrating
our retiring faculty and also awarding, along
with the Foundation, a number of awards for our
Outstanding Teacher and Support to Instruction, and also our
President’s [inaudible] awards. That will be June 6. It’s a Thursday evening, from
6:00 to 9 p.m. at Eden Garden, and tickets are currently
available at the Student Bank
for purchase.>>And I guess I’ll also
make this announcement that I believe they
are still looking for submissions for
the cookbook. So if you have not
been in [inaudible], I have put in two recipes –>>Oh.>>– so come on folks. Let’s get some recipes in there. This is going to be
good [inaudible].>>Yeah.>>You bet.>>All right. All right, everyone. Thank you.>>Thanks.>>And my favorite — [ Multiple Speakers ]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *