Barnard Reunion 2017: AABC Awards Ceremony Part 2

Barnard Reunion 2017: AABC Awards Ceremony Part 2


[APPLAUSE] Wow, thank you, Mary Ann. The next award is the
Millicent Carey McIntosh Award for Feminism, and Nancy
talked about some of her words and feminist perspective,
back in an era where it was less common to
hear that voice and those words. The Millicent Carey
McIntosh Feminism Award was established in 2004
to honor a woman who exemplifies the strong,
independent traditions of Barnard. She personifies
Barnard’s commitment to the education of women
and our graduates’ influence throughout our society. This year’s recipient is
Aruna Rao, class of 1977. [APPLAUSE] Congratulations. Thanks. This class of 1977
is a real powerhouse. It’s intimidating
to the class of ’79. Aruna Rao, Barnard
class of 1988, leading expert on gender
equality, human rights, and institutional change. Working towards a more
inclusive world and helping us learn to live with the
joyful bravery you invoke. After your stellar
start at Barnard, you went on to
strengthen and often introduce the theories
and practices of feminism across the globe. With over 30 years
of experience, particularly in
Asia and Africa, you have combined advocacy and
cutting-edge research on gender and institutional change, and
you have applied your wisdom at multiple levels, from
global initiatives and research on public sector reform
to implementing policies and practices in
the private sector, to grassroots engagements
with women in rural areas. In the mid-’90s, you led the
BRAC Gender Team in Bangladesh. Then in 1999, you
co-wrote Gender at Work, Organizational
Change for Equality, a book that led to the
organization, Gender at Work, which you
co-founded two years later. Today, you serve as
the Executive Director of the Transnational
Feminist Network, committed to ending
discrimination against women in the workplace
and advancing cultures of equality by
changing social norms and ending the status quo,
challenges you’ve somehow always managed to meet. And you have given back
to so many organizations in need, serving on the
board of the Association for Women’s Rights and
Development and CIVICUS World Alliance for
Citizen Participation. In addition, you have been
advisor and consultant to the Bill and Melinda
Gates Foundation, the Global Fund for Women,
Oxfam, and the World Bank, to name a few. Recently, you have
turned your attention to building the capacities
of young professional women through courses and workshops
on feminist leadership. Dr. Rao, in honor of your
milestone 40th Barnard reunion, we are delighted to present
you with the Millicent McIntosh Carey award for Feminism, in
the spirit of Barnard’s own Mrs. Mac, who encouraged alumnae
to make the world a better place for women. Thank you very much, Terry. It’s really a delight
and a deep honor. First of all, I want
to thank the Alumnae Association of Barnard
College for this award. I am really am deeply
humbled and I’m deeply grateful for this recognition. This award means a lot to
me, coming, as it does, from my own college, and I
know many of you in the room feel that way, a
connection to Barnard. Coming here, itself,
for me, was a dream that I never imagined
possible, actually. I was living in
Japan at the time and I remember when the
mailman came with an envelope, you remember, the thin
envelops meant, you know– [LAUGHTER] And the fat envelopes were
like, mm, this looks good. So the fat envelope
arrives and there was a full scholarship,
in those days, for $3100, a full
tuition scholarship. [INAUDIBLE] And I was thrilled. And it really was, I
have to say, thanks to my parents, who
defied the talk about, why should you send a girl
all the way across the seas to a university in
the United States? And made the
sacrifice that really enabled me to be here today. And so they’re not
here with me anymore, but my dearest
thanks are to them. Like many of you, Barnard
opened lots of doors for me. It was my first
time in New York. It was first time, obviously,
living in the United States. It really enabled
me to understand some of the issues which I
then devoted my career to, my life to. I began working
on social justice, and particularly,
women’s rights and gender equality around the world. That became my life’s work,
and as many of the honorees before me have
said, as well, those are the kinds of
values and concerns that are under attack
now, from many quarters. And so, it’s really– we
need to redouble our efforts. And I, too, am given
a lot of optimism by the younger feminists
that we see, who are really– who we can work with
to continue that fight and to make sure that the
kinds of successes we garnered are not all lost. I, too, am really
happy that Barnard stayed a women’s college. [APPLAUSE] And really nurtured so many
young women who came after us. And I’m especially
happy and grateful for the support and
care that Barnard gave to my own daughter,
who graduated in 2016. [APPLAUSE] My family is here with
me this afternoon. My husband, Rider, from Norway,
our two daughters, Priya and Seripa, and without
you, this would not be as special as it is. You make it special, so thank
you for your presence here. [APPLAUSE] I also want to thank my dear
friends, Ronnie and Marilyn. Ronnie, I met my
second day on campus. So all the Indians
kind of got together. [LAUGHTER] Oh, there she is. And Marilyn, I met
a few days later. And I had the pleasure of
having my Broadway debut in Marilyn’s senior project. I was Dottie at the
Minor Latham Playhouse, just a few blocks
down from here. And we have stayed close,
dear friends all these years, and that is a huge
treasure in my life. So thank you for being here. I also want to thank Joanne, who
is my quintessential New York friend, who you saw
her photo up there. We were both in the
UN General Assembly. Joanne has walked many
of the paths with me in our work on gender equality
and women’s rights globally, and I’m privileged to
share this moment with you. So thank you for being here. I love you all. Thank you, deeply,
to Barnard College for this wonderful award. I will treasure it always. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] Congratulations to each of
our very deserving awardees. While we look
forward to welcoming Barnard’s eighth president, Sian
Beilock, officially next month, it is now my pleasure to
invite a gentleman who has guided Barnard through this
transition with compassion, calm leadership, and devotion
to the college and its mission and community. Please welcome Interim President
and Chief Operating Officer, Rob Goldberg, to the stage
to present the Distinguished Alumnae Awards. [APPLAUSE] Thanks, Terry. It’s a pleasure to be here. Welcome. I think I want to
go to school here. [INAUDIBLE] Great. Congratulations,
Nancy, Jan, Mary Ann, our recipients for awards
for service to Barnard. Congratulations. Great speeches. You just prove the rule
of why we’re all here. As volunteers, the
work you do strengthens the bonds between the college
and the broader alumnae community. We thank you for you countless
hours and efforts and tribute. A great deal of our
success is all of you. We deeply appreciate
your contributions. Well, this award
is a recognition for all that you have done,
leading to this point, we know that we can continue
to count on your devotion to supporting the college
for years to come. I think you’ve made that
quite clear on your remarks. Thank you very much. And to Aruna, as you know,
the award you received today is named for a
pioneering Barnard woman. The legacy of President
McIntosh lives on today, and I invite you all to visit
the Millicent Carey McIntosh dining room upstairs, on
the second floor, included in a photo exhibit of
her time at Barnard. And now, it’s my honor to
present the Distinguished Alumnae Awards. Established in 1967 as a
way to honor and inspire outstanding Barnard
women, this award is given to a select
few alumnae each year who personify the ideals and
excellence of a liberal arts education and who have achieved
considerable distinction in their chosen fields. I’m pleased to present you this
year’s Distinguished Alumnae. The first award goes to
Joan Hamburg class of 1957. [APPLAUSE] Joan Hamburg, Barnard
class of 1957. Long time ago. [LAUGHTER] For over a half a
century, you have starred in a marvelous career. From your voice on the radio
to your words on the page, when you speak, we listen. As a student, you were
already full of good ideas that you yearned to
share with others. You wrote New York
on $5 a Day, and it was published by [? Kram ?] with
Arthur Frommer of Travel Guide fame. No hotel too seedy, no
restaurant too cheap, to be investigated and included. Later, you advised
on everything, from nuptials to super savings
in publications including City Weddings, The New York
Lunch Book, and Our Little Black Book of Shopping Secrets. For 10 years, you
also wrote a column for Family Circle magazine. But it was in your
radio broadcast that you truly made your mark. Beginning in the early
’70s, you aired segments on shopping for bargains
during the popular Rambling and Gambling program,
every morning. 30 years later, you’ve
earned the title of First Lady of New
York Radio by hosting the daily two-hour
Joan Hamburg Show, and grew to cover every
imaginable subject of national-level interest. Devoted listeners relied on
you for cultural information, travel recommendations,
dependable restaurant reviews, and even medical advice. No matter the
message, you are known for your warmth, integrity,
moxie, and curiosity, and always the
highest-quality programming. You’ve interviewed big
celebrities and powerful politicians and traveled
the world in the process, and for it all, you have
earned such kudos as a Lifetime Achievement Award from The
Alliance for Women and Media Foundation, New Yorker of the
year, and perhaps the ultimate, your portrait on
the wall at Sardi’s. [LAUGHTER] You are indeed a
New York institution and a beloved Barnard alumna. We are delighted to celebrate
your milestone 60th reunion and honor your boundless energy
and expertise with the 2017 Distinguished Alumna Award. Congratulations. [APPLAUSE] Thank you. In fact, I see the picture
there is one of my pals I met, and we went to
Barnard together, Joan Himes [? Guysmar, ?] and we are
also friends to this very day. You know, my path was
very different from all the amazing women whose
stories we’ve listened to. The ’50s. A lot of our
expertise in marching was geared towards
marching down the aisle. [LAUGHTER] –in a white dress. That’s the way that it worked. But I came to Barnard and
I found Dean McIntosh. And I cannot tell you. Barnard literally
changed my life. She said, do it. Go out and do it and
be anything you want. Don’t just get married. Get married, but make sure you
leave a mark on your world. And it was so exhilarating. I don’t know why I needed
that permission, but I did. And her voice, to this
day, is still with me. And we would sit in the
James Room and eat egg salad sandwiches– the food
is much better now– [LAUGHTER] –And talk about her. And I look at all of
you remarkable women, those who ave garnered awards
today, and just Barnard women. But when we were
there, in the ’50s, we didn’t know when we got,
unless we had a profession, we didn’t understand what
climbing the ladder was. We didn’t know what
glass ceilings were. We never heard of such stuff. We didn’t know what we were
going to be when we grew up, but there was
something right there. And by the way, the
only skills that we had to have to get a
job, now, when I think back, I came out of
Barnard, I wrote a thesis on American architecture. I had a wonderful time. I never did anything with it,
except admire buildings, but– [LAUGHTER] However, you could
not get a job, even if you were a genius,
unless you knew how to type shorthand and speedwriting. Some of you remember that. You can read this. You can take shorthand. Well, unfortunately
for me, I was a lefty. changed to righty,
so no one could read my writing, including myself. I had a fabulous
memory because of that. I’d go on all those
job interviews and they would dictate
and I’d pretend to be speedwriting the damn
thing, but I memorized it. [LAUGHTER] [INAUDIBLE] And the same skill
that landed me the job, which started my
career, actually destroyed it. I was working for a magazine
called Coupon Magazine. It had a very short life, but I
didn’t have a long life there, either. However, my job,
speedwriting, was to write to all the heads
of huge corporations, offering them their ads in
four-color in our magazine with editorial usage of it. Now, I was lousy
as a typist, so I invited the president of
General Foods to put his ads, A-D-S, only my usual typo. I ended up inviting
him to put his ass in our magazine in four-color,
with editorial usage of it. [LAUGHTER] He didn’t like it. And he demanded my rear
end, so I was fired. And as I walked to
the door, the editor, who later, we found out,
was the Queen of Porn, in New York City, there was– I said to someone at
lunch, what did we know? We were the best
among the girls. And we just– we were
polite, sometimes, we didn’t do too much of
anything that was wrong, or at least never admitted it. We kept it secret,
but we didn’t get any, and in this job, porn, having
an affair, it meant catered. We didn’t understand
anything that was going on. So I ended up, as I was about
to leave, the editor said, can you write better
than you can type? I said, I’m a
really good writer. What did I know? Anyway, I ended up
writing, and that was the beginning of this career. Ultimately,
advertising, saw America through selling Campbell’s Soup. Duluth, Minnesota,
I must tell you, I hope no one’s from there. It’s really cold. And you had to serve
soup on the ice, so that they would buy
Campbell’s tomato soup, but it was OK. I ended up at New
York Magazine where my editor, a very
famous man, now gone, but a wonderful
person, Clay Felker, he said to us, like Dean
McIntosh, you guys have to be more than
you think you are. Just because you’re writing
stories, you’re doing this, I want more. I said, what do you what? He said, I want you
to be a radio person. I don’t know how to
be a radio person. But it didn’t matter,
because he told me a large station in New York was
firing a popular broadcaster. Some of you may
remember Bob Grant. He would tell everyone
to get off the phone and he was being
sued, constantly, so they said they wanted
a woman, a nice woman. That was my qualification. [LAUGHTER] Anyway, after all,
the magazine was long gone, the little theater group
I was in, my relatives had stopped coming. They were really sick of going
to the same show every night. That was closed. So I ended up at W, not WOR
then, it was WMCA radio. And when I said to the
man, Peter Straus, who owned the magazine and
the broadcast station, what am I supposed
to talk about? He said, well, you’re a woman. Think tuna fish. And I– [LAUGHTER] –I said, what does that mean? He said, it’s a woman’s thing. So I talked about tuna fish. And you know, the
journey was not easy. We had kids. We had husbands. We had very few role
models in the ’60s. Really, no one we knew, unless
they were professionals. I didn’t know almost any woman
who was doing what I did. And yet, when I came home
at the end of the day, I was still expected to
do the [INAUDIBLE] run. And the women’s movement was
definitely rearing its head. The problem is it
missed my house. [LAUGHTER] And no one told me,
except for Dean McIntosh, that I could do it all. We had no expectation,
our generation. I got a big kick out
of my kids saying, I’m going to do this at
this stage and that at that. We didn’t know. We just let life push
us along, and it pushed. And it really started working. And I was absolutely lucky, and
I learned from my early days at Barnard that you can make
a difference, and you can give and you can give back. And I feel I’ve
been very blessed to share one of the
greatest cities in the world with a large audience, and
now thanks to the digital age and streaming and
everything else, we are heard almost everywhere. And whenever you
want to hear it. But when all is said and
done– and I want to thank all of you– it’s Barnard college that
said to me, go out and do it. Be it, do it, and always
remember to give back. So to the future, and
the future is all of you, I have full faith that
representing Barnard, yourself, your families,
your countries, you are going to go out and do it
and make a real difference. And thank you for the honor,
the privilege, and the pleasure, all of you. [APPLAUSE] Thank you, Joan. Congratulations. That was wonderful. Our second recipient
of this award celebrated her 50th reunion this
weekend, Carol Stock Kranowitz. [APPLAUSE] Carol Stock Kranowitz, Barnard
class of 1967, observer and educator, expert in sensory
processing and integration, we thank you for
giving kids a better life throughout your
impressive career. After Barnard, you earned
an MA in Education and Human Development from the George
Washington University. You spent 25 years as a music,
movement, and drama teacher. In that time, you witnessed many
preschoolers who, as you say, were out of sync, and you made
it your business to help them. You begin to study
sensor processing and sensory integration, and in
doing so, learned to identify the needs of your
young students. You introduced the theory behind
Sensory Processing Disorder, SPD, and in your many
writings and workshops, you share your expertise
with parents, educators, and other early
childhood professionals, along with helpful
sensorimotor techniques used in school and at home. Your groundbreaking book,
The Out-of Sync Child, sold one million copies and was
the first in a popular series. With its drug-free
approach, Out-of-Sync offers hope to disheartened
parents who are trying to help their
children function in society. It was selected by
Brainchild Magazine as one of the top 10 books about
children with disabilities. Your most recent in
the series is entitled, The Out-of-Sync Child
Grows Up, Coping with SPD in the Adolescent
and Young Adult Years. With all of this, you’re
in constant demand as a speaker, nationally
and internationally, and you’ve been
widely recognized for increasing public awareness
and understanding of SPD. We’re especially
honored that you’ll be speaking at
this reunion as you celebrate your 50th anniversary
of your Barnard graduation. We are grateful for
your determination to find new approaches
to complex problems and to your devotion
to children in need. It is an honor to present you
with the 2017 Distinguished Alumna Award. Congratulations. [APPLAUSE] I am vertically challenged. Barnard, thank you, Barnard. I loved my four years
here at Barnard, and I thought I learned so much. I thank Barnard for
teaching me a lot and for encouraging all of us
to get things done, and that has been a theme from our
other award recipients today, how we were taught to do that. So, I really listened
with interest in the senior seminar
on restoration drama, when English professor,
Lucille Hook said to a bunch of us
seniors, you know, you really haven’t
learned very much. She said, you’ve learned a
smattering of this and that, but you have learned
one big thing, and that is how to learn. And then she gave
us this charge. Said to us, keep
asking questions. Never pigeonhole what you learn. Apply it to everything else
that you’re looking into. Share your knowledge. So I did. 30 years ago, I was teaching
preschool, and asking questions about children who were,
well, I call them out-of-sync, clumsy, confused, miserable
with the ordinary childhood experiences that their
classmates enjoy. These children
deeply touched me. Eventually, I learned
that their problem was something called Sensory
Processing Disorder, or SPD. SPD is a complicated
neurological condition that interferes with
children’s responses to sensations of
touch and movement. How to catch children with
Sensory Processing Disorder before they fall through
educational cracks became my thing. Though neither an occupational
therapist nor a scientist, nor a parent of a child
with sensory challenges, I felt driven to explain
SPD in simple terms. It was important
to me that others could understand these
children, who were too small to speak for themselves. Important to me to do it,
but how could I do it? Who was I? Around that time, I visited
an exhibit of Georgia O’Keeffe at the Phillips
Gallery in Washington. By the way, did you all
know Georgia O’Keeffe studied and taught at Teachers
College, about 100 years ago? So I was looking at
Georgia O’Keeffe’s poppies and I realized that what she
did was she took a small flower and made it big so that
people could really see it. SPD was my small
flower, my small subject that I brought to light in my
first book, The Out-of-Sync Child, that came out in 1998. Well, I was quite surprised to
learn that SPD is not so small. In fact, it affects not
just children, but also people of all ages. It coexists with countless
other developmental delays, with physical and mental
conditions, and with aging. So, I was interested
to find out that what I wrote about interested maybe
more people than the audience I originally thought
I was addressing. My books answer and
help parents and others know what to do with
their out-of-sync people. Margaret Mead, who
graduated in ’17– that is, 1917– and who won
this award herself in 1971, famously said, never
doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed
citizens can change the world. Indeed, it’s the only
thing that ever has. From my little corner in
the child development world, I’m very pleased that my books
and presentations have improved the lives of many children
with bewildering sensory issues and their baffled grownups. I’m proud to have made
some change in the world, and there are still many
more things to get done. So, Barnard’s recognition of
my work is the biggest honor. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] Thank you very much. Congratulations. And congratulations to
all of our honorees. I will now invite Lori
Hoepner, class of ’94, Chair of the AABC
Fellowship Committee, who’ll present the Alumnae
Association Fellowships for Graduate Studies. Thank you very much. [APPLAUSE] Thank you, Interim
President Goldberg, and good afternoon, everyone. I am a member of
the class of 1994, and I just completed
my first year as Chair of the AABC Fellowship
Committee, a standing committee of the AABC board. The AABC Fellowship for Graduate
Study is endowed by a gift from the Edith and Frances
Mulhall Achilles Memorial Fund. Edith was class of ’14, 1914,
and Frances was class of 1945. Each year, the committee
awards fellowships for full-time graduate study to
graduating seniors and alumnae of all ages who show a clear
interest in her field of study, demonstrates strong
motivation and potential for accomplishment, and presents
a creative approach to her work and a willingness to
explore uncharted territory, and I think you’ll see
that in our awardees today. Really This year, we
received 55 applications and are delighted to
award five fellowships. The applicants
continue to demonstrate the exceptional
accomplishments and dedication and purpose of Barnard alumnae,
and the committee, as always, had a great deal of difficulty
in choosing among them. Two of our recipients
are here today and you will meet them
shortly, but first, I would like to tell you about
the three other awardees who are unable to join
us this afternoon. Gabrielle Borenstein, class of
2015, a Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society student at
Barnard, is currently a PhD student in anthropology
at Cornell University. Her current research
explores how the material world
influences social, religious, and political life, and her
dissertation examines this through the lens of the Bronze
Age communities in the South Caucasus and the
Ancient Near East. Sarah Levine, class of 2014,
is entering Yale Law School this coming fall. A magnum cum laude
graduate of Barnard College with a major in urban studies
and political science, Sarah will continue her
work at the intersection of policy and technology
to find practical solutions to social problems. Rachel Susser, class of
2015, is pursuing a masters in music and flute performance
at the Royal Academy of Music in London. In addition to honing
her performance skills, her research explores the use
of alternative performance practices as a means to subvert
the racial, colonial, class, gender, and other
hierarchies perpetuated by classical musical discourse. A Fulbright Scholar, Rachel
graduated from Barnard Phi Beta Kappa with a major in computer
science and music technology. So, [INAUDIBLE]. [LAUGHTER] All right, so on
to finish the show. I would like to now ask Caroline
Gleason to join me onstage to receive her
fellowship certificate. [APPLAUSE] Caroline, a member of the
Barnard class of 2012, majored in biology,
graduated summa cum laude. She is a second-year
PhD candidate in cancer biology at Memorial
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Her thesis focuses on
cellular senescence, a state where cells are alive
but permanent growth-arrested. Senescence plays a role
in a number diseases and physiological process,
and is a desirable means of halting tumor procession. Caroline, on behalf of
the Alumnae Association of the Barnard College
Fellowship Committee, it is my distinct
pleasure to award you this fellowship
for your graduate study during the 2017-2018
academic year. [APPLAUSE] OK, and now, Josephine McGowan,
please join me onstage. [APPLAUSE] Josephine is a 2016
Barnard graduate with a major in
neurology and behavior and a minor in English. She is currently a PhD student
in the neurology and behavior program at Columbia
University where she focuses on the underlying
biological basis of stress resilience. Her thesis research is aimed at
uncovering mechanisms of stress resilience and developing
pharmaceuticals to prevent stress-induced
psychiatric disorders. Josephine, on behalf of the
Alumnae Association of Barnard College Fellowship Committee,
it is my distinct honor to award you this fellowship
for your graduate studies during the 2017-2018
academic year. Congratulations. [APPLAUSE] Please join me in congratulating
these exceptional students as we look forward to learning
about their future studies and professional
accomplishments. [APPLAUSE] And I would also like to thank
my fellow committee members for their thoughtful dedication,
hard work, and long hours in selecting this
year’s awardees. Very long hours, like
10 o’clock at night. Next year’s fellowship
applications will be available
in the early fall, so open to any alum, graduate,
current senior who is pursuing full-time graduate study. Notification will be posted
on the alumnae website. And thank you. [APPLAUSE] Thank you, Lori,
and congratulations to both of our Distinguished
Alumnae Award Recipients. Wonderful to hear your
advice and your stories.

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