City Council – July 17, 2019 – Part 1 of 2

City Council – July 17, 2019 – Part 1 of 2


If I can ask members of council to please
come into the council chambers? Members of council could you please take your
seats. This meeting is now resumed.
Members if I could ask you to rise for a moment of silence and please remember oldan naliha.
[Moment of Silence] we have two presentations this morning.
The first is to recognize Diane young on her retirement from the City of Toronto.
I would like to call upon Mark Grimes to come forward for the presentation.
Thank you Madam Speaker and good morning. We started off yesterday with a — kind of
a sad note. We’re starting the second day with sad.
We’re losing another great one this morning as we say good to Chris brillinger yesterday
but today I recognize Diane young as she’s retiring after a remarkable 31 years in Toronto
including 22 years of CEO, chief officer of exhibition place.
I had a chance to talk to Alan at Diane’s retirement party.
He asked her to come down in 1997 for a temporary assignment.
What a great 22 years it’s been Diane. Diane accomplished a career as the CEO.
She played a pivotal in the transformation of the site of a vibrant meeting destination.
Great example of things that happened here the three year deal she signed with collision.
There’s so many to mention. She is a word leader in environmental stewardship
creating a legacy for years to come and citizens of Toronto.
Under her strategic leadership she’s home to the field, raptor practice, the coliseum
and major sporting events through the city. One was the Pan Am games which was fan task.
Fifa under 20 mens world cup and women’s world cup.
World classic. Diane served long term partnership to making
exhibition place the largest convention site in Toronto.
The 192 acre sight with five million and integrity part of Ontario’s economy.
It’s exhibition place. Former chair and Deputy Mayor taught me very
soon to my term on the board exhibition place. Not the groves it’s exhibition place.
We had a going away party for Diane. It’s remarkable.
The number of tenants that wanted to speak. We had ward earl, the singing solicitor.
I don’t know if he’s here this morning. He brought his guitar and sang don’t go, Diane.
You can probably get a copy and the former mlc employee bob Hunter was there.
The can dedinatos were there, former chair Joe pantlone was there and Alan tonks who
put her there in 1997. Last but not least Henry hotel x he spoke.
I know it was Diane’s baby. She made it clear she wanted to see this thing
open and hang around to make sure it got opened. Diane it’s open.
If you haven’t been down to hotel x, go down. That is what is her legacy, that hotel.
There’s an option to build another one. We’ll invite you to that when it does come.
On behalf of the City of Toronto I would like to thank you for your excellent service and
dedication as a valued leader and we ask the mayor to please come forward with a scroll
for you. [Applause] Diane, this is not to take away
from your honour here today at all but thank goodness we don’t have a singing chair of
exbig place board. I want to thank you for that incredible record
of service that Councillor Grimes made reference to.
I am hold enough. Not as old as Councillor Grimes but old enough
to recommend that etch big place was a place where aside from that you were never sure
on a tonnous basis what was going on there. Now it’s a place where as Councillor Grimes
said there’s year round testifyity of all kinds there.
It was a source of great pride to us that we could have something like collision, very
much a 21st century event that did put us on the map at an excellent facility that was
a global quality. There are many other events I could talk about.
I, myself, many some have not been to the hoe text I happened to good there.
Hadn’t been until a couple months ago until I was early to go a recognition event in memory
of people that died in a plane crash not too long ago and went into the hotel.
And it’s just dumb founding how incredible that hotel is.
That is a tribute both to the developer but also to you and to your work in shepherding
that through. It took time.
Look good food it takes tomorrow. It’s a truly spectacular hotel and huge addition.
I look at it from the standpoint of the future. I very much hope, but I hope we can find a
way and Councillor Cressy is working on where we can get a good revitalization of Ontario
place with our complete input as should be the case because it’s in our city because
I would like to see us find a way to do something with exhibition place that continues this
work at the same time and did the two in cooperation. We’ll see if it proves to be possible or not.
What you’ve done is put us in a stronger position to be a part after this going forward thanks
to the evolution of exhibition place that happened on your watch.
So I will just add to Councillor Grimes saying congratulations of not just the City Council
but the people of the City of Toronto for all of your efforts over all these many years.
As I said yesterday to Chris brillinger when he was retiring.
Unfortunately, as you well know, there’s not much we can do by giving a greater token but
it carries with it I hope a special sentiment from us as to our gratitude and recognition
of your excellent contribution to the city in many different respects but particularly
exhibition place over the years and you’ve receive it in that respect.
Thank you very much. We’ll take a picture over here.
[Applause] just a few words because I know last council meeting.
Summer is coming. Here we go.
It’s an honour for me to be part of public service in City of Toronto and metro.
I started my first job in metro and moved on to the amalgamated city.
I can’t tell you how great it is to be — the best we have is 22 years at any morning.
Nothing I would have imagined as I graduated from law school.
It was really wonderful. Many thanks to the board of governors and
to the City Council. Because we have brought numerous, numerous
requests here for loans and building projects, et cetera and they’ve always received the
support of this City Council. And also a shout out to exhibition place because
the staff at exhibition place have made it happen and have go every day to try to deliver
great services to clients. Just to note, I kind of hung on until July
31 because yesterday at council, there was a small report about a heritage easement amendment
and it’s all about the bridge. The bridge that will connect that 400 room
wonderful hotel to 210,000 square feet of conference and gala space and then there’s
another connection from the beanfield centre to our 800,000 square feet of exhibition place.
With that, we can market ourselves as a self contained connected conference convention
facility. That is key in our industry.
And I know as I am leaving our sales team and our entire staff are so dedicated to not
— to making that sales pitch for Toronto and bringing more collisions to Toronto in
this great convention facility which is the largest in the Canada, six largest in North
America. We are determined — they are determined to
increase that surplus to the city over the $5 million and increase that economic impact
over the $4.25 million because that is what this business can do for Toronto and it is
an exciting business and we know kit — it can happen.
Thank you again for this recognition. Thank you for all the support you’ve given
me and exhibition place and board of governors over these 22 years.
Thank you. [Applause] our second presentation is to recognize
the Toronto winners at the China innovation and entrepreneurship international competition.
I would like to call upon Deputy Mayor Minnan-Wong. We’re here to recognize the Toronto award
winners from the 2019 Shenzhen international competition.
I would like to acknowledge our guests this morning from the people’s republic of China.
[Applause] it’s known as the Silicon Valley of Asia, a dynamic high tech city of 18 million
people. It’s expat community established a relationship
with the City of Toronto in 2015 through a memorandum of understanding.
Since then the progress our city cities have made is nothing short of remarkable.
Not only have there been several exchanges but the community moved quickly for what they
refer to as Shenzhen speed to promote the commercialization of studies.
The city has established a global innovation competition to promote innovation and help
entrepreneurs develop their products. Please watch the video to get a feeling for
the size and scope of this global competition. Nch a breath between Shenzhen and Toronto.
Two cities to be friendship city we started in 2016.
♪ ♪ we have innovation competition, innovation festival each year.
We set up innovation centers and companies to develop in China especially find more investors,
customer and commerce. So competitions have taken place in cities
such as New York, San Francisco, Israel, London and the Canadian finals have taken place at
Toronto city hall for the past three years. There are 1850 global competitors this year.
Of them 137 traveled to Shenzhen for the global finals.
Today we’re happy to recognize the Toronto innovation companies that made it to the times
and won several top prizes. I would ask the representatives from each
company to stand as I read their name. Fibos won the gold medal in the internet of
things category by key signing an optical measurement platform to be used in industrial
sensing applications. [Applause] genesis bioindustries won the gold
medal in new energy and materials final competition and silver medal in the grand final competition.
They are work on creating bacteria that turns organic waste to valuable chemicals.
[Applause] arht won the silver model for creating materials as a fraction of the cost of similar
technologies. [Applause] and nano device solutions came
home with the bronze medal in the advanced manufacturing final competition for high quality
and high resolution atomic force microscope. [Applause] in addition to the outstanding
platform of these companies in the 2019 competition two other Toronto companies have been awarded
significant prizes. Condavi medical inc. Won the silver in biology
and life science and silver in the final and imaging systems that look at coronary arteries
and heart structure. Tap lock one the bronze in electronic science
and technology for developing the first smart finger print padlock.
[Applause] also I would like to recognize the Canadian confed race of Shenzhen association
and sci innovation centre. Jenny is the chairperson of Canadian federation
and has been the catalyst and key architect of the Shenzhen relationship with the City
of Toronto. [Applause] Leo is the president and CEO of
sci innovations centre in the City of Toronto. And rosa as the chair and other is the chair
of sci experts advisory council. We’re grateful to sci innovation in the work
in supports team Toronto and team Canada. [Applause] the innovation, creativity and
position of these companies positioned Canada as a global leader in technology and innovation.
We’re proud of you for your accomplishments. Please join me in congratulations them for
great success. Thank you, Madam Speaker.
May I just say Madam Speaker that beyond what the Deputy Mayor said about this particular
competition I wanted to pay special tribute. He served as a minister in the government
specifically in the area of innovation. When you see report not just this news but
news this morning that we again in 2018 were the third biggest source of tech and innovative
jobs in all of North America. It’s a tribute to his hard work that he did.
I can assure you as mayor and before I dealt with him and he made a big contribution and I wanted to acknowledge that while he is here.
Thank you. [Applause] thank you very much and congratulations.
Members of council, we will now review and confirm the order paper.
There are 122 items left on the agenda including 53 member motions.
Yesterday council set times for a number of items.
I will summarize the items and seek council’s guidance on how it wishes to proceed this
morning. Council previously scheduled items IE6.11
on the cycling network plan update and item IE6.12 on cycling network plan 2019 cycling
infrastructure installation be considered together as the first items after the mayor’s
key matters. As the mayor’s key matters were only completed
before the recess, council has not started these items.
Council has also scheduled the following items for this morning, au3.14 on opening doors
to stable housing and effective waiting list and reduced vacancy rates help more people
access housing CC9.28 on a 6020 and 630bather street.
CC9.29 on 60-40bather street zoning by-law amendment application.
CC9.16, on Murray road, regeneration and land use study.
City initiated official plan amendment. And then as well, City Council will consider
member motions at 2 p.m. Our first item after members motion will be
EX7.10 on Toronto Hydro Corporation and or general meeting 2018 audited financial statement.
That is followed by item CC9.2 the ombudsman Toronto inquiry report on review of Toronto
Transit Commission investigation of the February 182018 incident involving transit inspectors.
Is it the wish of council if consider the cycling items first this morning followed
by the other timed items? As you know everyone moved motions to timed
items and these are the items that were timed for today and so I would suggest considering
that we completed the mayor’s key item on vision zero that we continue with the two
items IE6.11 and 6.12 on cycling network plan. Everyone okay with that?
And then we’ll — all in favour? Carried.
I will now take the release of member holds. Deputy Mayor Minnan-Wong.
Thank you, Madam Chair. Page three Executive Committee EX7.5 planning
recreation facilities for the Don Mills community. I have two motions I have reviewed and have
the support of staff from. One is create to a development timeline and
other one is to create a community outreach strategy.
I would like to move that with the report. This is on page 3EX7.5.
The amendments are on the screen. Record vote.
Councillor Thompson did you want to hold it down?
After the vote? Can I do it after the vote.
On the amendment, recorded vote. [Voting] item as amended.
All in favour? Carried.
Councillor Thompson on a point of personal privilege I would like to comment and congratulate
the leadership of Deputy Mayor Minnan-Wong on this particular issue.
This was a very tough issue for whim respect to his community and so on.
There could have been a much more difficult as it relates to people in conflict and challenges
we’re experiencing in the cities with respect to the.
Councillor Pasternak. I requested the timing of items on page 10CC9.28 and 9.29,
I would be prepared to move the confidential attachments and the recommendations therein.
Release them now. Okay.
So on page 10, CC9.28 Councillor Pasternak is releasing the issues.
All in favour, carried. CC9.29.
All in favour, carried. Thank you.
Councillor Fletcher? Yes, speaker.
This say timed item so that would take care of that.
Thank you. It’s a timed item.
That would remove that timing. You are releasing it.
Yes. I’m releasing it.
Okay, sorry. On page 3EX7.10, Councillor Fletcher is releasing.
All in favour — recorded vote. [Voting] item areas unanimously, 22 in favour.
Councillor Cressy? Thank you.
Page 10 item CC9.26, zoning by-law amendment the solicitors report is being circulated
and I can release that. CC9.26.
504 wellington street on page 10. Okay.
Councillor Cressy see leasing CC9.26, 504 wellington all in favour, carried.
Thank you. Speaker on page 8 item te7.3, 300bloor street
west. I held as it local Councillor.
I believe Councillor Layton is ready to release wit a quick amendment.
Thank have you he much, Madam Speaker. Just one sec, okay.
Cleshs have the amendment with some clarification on the direction.
They don’t have it yet. We’ll hold it down until it’s ready.
Councillor Holyday. Yes, thank you Madam Speaker.
Page 3. Au3.6.
Auditor general’s 2019 status report on outstanding audit recommendations for city agencies and
corporations. I did have a technical amendment.
Does the staff have it? I hope so.
Is it just changing the individual reporting from the Audit Committee to the auditor general
to the CEO of Toronto Transit Commission to be consistent with the way we’re doing the
other reports. Thank you.
The amendment is on the screen. All in favour?
Carried. Item as amended, all in favour, carried.
Councillor Karygiannis. Thank you, Madam Speaker, on page 5, GL6.12,
I looked at it. I’m okay with it.
I would like to release it. Which item is it?
I’m sorry. Which item.
GL6.12? Okay.
Do we have the amendment. You are just releasing it.
It’s on the screen. Same favour, carried.
GL6.13 final report on property acquisitions, appropriation and leases.
They do have amendment. Sorry.
It’s — we let it go through because of sale or release taking place.
The amendment is on the screen. Do we want to continue holding it?
I will hold it. Continue holding it.
Increasing penalty amounts for stopping and parking violation.
I rarely do this and I want to thank you and your office for the work you have done.
Certainly this will go a long way to answer questions of people that park across the schools
and on school bus zones and everything else and I would like to release it.
Recorded vote, please. GL6.25 all in favour.
Recorded vote, please. Sorry recorded vote.
Recorded vote. Councillor Layton, please.
Item carries unanimously. 22 in favour.
Councillor Perks. You have another one?
Not sure if staff have IE6.13. What page?
Page 6. If you don’t have it ready, can I do it after
lunch you have it ready? Okay, after lunch.
Is that it? It’s on the screen?
6.13. Madam Speaker Metrolinx in its usual fashion
was not cooperating with the merchants in my area.
They were not communicating to my residents. We did have a meeting with City of Toronto
staff and I want to thank them for going the extra mile and getting Metrolinx on the table
and this comes out of this. For us to have a community liaison and speak
to them and get answers we need. Okay.
Love it, Jim. The amendment is on the screen.
Okay, okay. The amendment is on the screen.
All in favour? Carried.
Item as amended, all in favour? Carried.
Councillor Perks. Good morning, speaker on page 3 I can release
EX7.17 capital variance report for the four months.
EX7.17 all in favour? Carried.
Councillor Grimes? Thank you, Madam Speaker, wanted to give you
notice on page 8 — page 9, bottom of page you CC9.14.
I have to go in camera on this item to let you know.
We can schedule that. Thank you.
All those in favour of adopting the order paper?
All in favour? Carried.
So we’ll go to IE6.11 which is the cycling network plan.
Questions? Nobody has 234eu — any questions.
Okay. Councillor Layton.
Thank you very much Madam Speaker, in the report there was an amendment made.
I’ll let transportation staff get comfortable in the hot seat.
My questions are about the cycling network plan update.
The — unfortunate changes made at committee one that was added include developing — this
is recommendation 17. So this involves developing a set of warrants
similar to traffic calming to support the installation of bike lane.
What now goes into the thought process about the installation of bike lanes?
Through the speaker, the overall cycling network plan is a network based analysis on the process
of determining which routes are very yiew cycling routes in terms of looking at the
destinations they serve, the resident population and employment population they serve.
The cycling safety incident history of those locations, the way that the routes would cross
barriers such as highways and ravines. Multifaceted analysis to determine the value
of that route for the network and then there’s an assessment on the impacts and benefits
to particular route and design when it’s proposed to come forward.
Before we bring forward a proposal, we do some analysis that says in is where the bike
lane should be based on where people, what routes people are using currently, where we
could put them on to safer streets and where their destinations might be as well as building
out a larger network. That’s correct.
The level of analysis depends on the scale of the project.
It’s not as easy as just kind of measuring the speed of traffic, the volume of traffic
and saying you are in, you are in the 20th percent aisle or 80th percentile, you look
at what streets can accommodate the lanes, where bikes are going and make a decision
on thais that? We — based on that.
We do. We look at potential demand and speed and
volume to understand what design type is most appropriate for that location.
It’s a multi-stepped process. Do you think it’s necessary for us to develop
a warrant process similar to traffic calming in order to justify the installation of bike
lanes in these cases? I think that the process that we undertake
already includes the checks and balances. Thank you very much.
Thank you. Deputy Mayor Minnan-Wong.
Thank you. On the same topic this is a question for the
general manager, we have a warrant process for stop signs and traffic calming devices
like speed bumps, yes? Through the speaker, we do.
And that provides a framework for this council to decide whether something should we recommended
and approved by this council, correct? Through the speaker, it does.
And so — sorry, have you having a conversation? Just to add that that process also defined
through the Ontario traffic management manual — Ontario traffic manual.
Okay. So — so it’s a consistent standard we apply
locally. Yes, within that arrangement, from time to
time, do you get motions from community council? Notices of motion?
I don’t think you can do it actually — it would be through community council they circumstance
couple vent the process and try — circumvent the process.
I’ll legal you answer the — I’ll let you answer the question.
No, no, this has to do with traffic calming. Okay.
Carry on. Finish your question, sorry.
Thank you. From time to time, you get motions from community
councils just to put in speed bumps and stop signs that wouldn’t meet the warrant process,
fair to say? We do.
We do an analysis related to the process and sometimes based on — I short circuits the
process and they don’t do that. Or the council will proceed with a different
approach. Has that ever happened with a bike lane.
With community feedback? Has there been a bike lane put in that hasn’t
been recommended by your staff? Through the speaker, not to my knowledge because
the process of installing the bike lane involves a detailed submission of by-laws required
and changes to parking and traffic regulation. It’s not snag could be made — something that
could be made through a single motion. Question for general manager of transportation,
your staff said that there’s a proper framework and we don’t need any more of a framework.
How many — what is the capacity — how many cyclists need to use a road before you recommend
a bike lane be put on it? Through the speaker, we don’t just make that
decision on existing volume. I know but is there a requirement that there
has to be a certain capacity on a road to warrant consideration for a bike lane.
Through the speaker, we could not require a certainly threshold of volume be met in
order add a facility on the roadway. Do you think it’s a good idea?
I do because I think typically latent demand is significant and that’s why we look at destination
and potential users. When you build a cycling facility you will
— almost always see a huge uptick in the number of users you wouldn’t see if they didn’t
feel comfortable previously. I don’t think existing volume a good indicator.
You don’t think the number of cyclists is a measure important in considering whether
they should be put in. It’s not the most important by any means.
Should it be criteria. Probably.
You think there should be criteria. Therefore there should be a warrant.
I said I think they should look at existing facilities comprehensively.
One of the things you look at is whether it has use which implies there’s desire line
on that facility connecting one or more destinations and people have choosing — chosen to use
the route. Do you ever get feedback once a bike lane
is put in that no one was using it and don’t you think it would help if there
was a measurement that tells they are used. Through the speaker, many my experience there’s
always a group of people who get engaged in transportation projects well in advance of
design and planning stage. When the project goes in there’s another group
that doesn’t understand how the interaction was going to happen.
We often have comments after the fact and we’re commit ted to tweaking a facility to
try to make them work. As we talked about previously in the council
the cycling network plan is just it’s a network plan.
The local access pieces are part of connecting a broader network in the city and that’s the
most critical thing. Thank you.
Councillor Ainslie? Thank you, through you, Madam Speaker, I wanted
to get clarification in the report it identified the west hill area as one of higher use areas
for bicycling in the report. So I’m trying to understand how you determine
bicycling infrastructure, for example, in that area because right now bike posts are
being put in on a request as basis. How with we accelerating bicycle infrastructure
in that area as demand is increasing? Yes, we are.
We have a project proposed in the near term plan on Ellesmere next year.
What about the whole area in general? We’re looking at an approach to — rather
than take projects on a one street by one street basis through the design consultation,
seeking council approval process, we are looking at a way to cluster the routes.
Which we propose today. We’re looking at network approaches to expansion.
I know in particular Ellesmere within that area is in the 2020 program.
I’m not just interested in the bike lanes or routes, fully supportive of those.
Trying to understand bike posts, bike rings, what are we doing to — they only seem to
be going in on a request basis. There’s a mix of request basis that comes
through to respond to where residents are needed to have more bike parking.
I know only a couple of requests within the ward recently and we’re open to receiving
more and looking at where to put more. We’ve been proactively putting in bike parking
within the city including at schools in partnership with the Toronto district school board.
We have a pro– board. We have a pro-active program along more retail
streets. Those locations where we can provide bike
parking in the right of way is a proactive process.
The other question I have one of charts it outlines the environmental assessments taking
place for bike lanes across the city one of them for Eglinton, Kingston road, Morningside.
Is that all tied in to the Kingston LRT-ea so you are waiting on the LRT to move forward
because you are going to consider bike lanes there?
The process for Eglinton is well underway in terms with egg Eglinton connects and future
sections east and west. The other components are currently planned
as part of LRT work but depending on how transit conversations happen at the city it may need
be programmed at a different time. We would be open to prying on a stand a–
programming on a stand alone study depending on the way they transpired.
If for some bizarre reason the LRT does not go forward were the bike lanes on the three
roads in the grand scheme of things. They are within the major routes program in
which we want to pursue full installation of.
We would still be pursuing the major routes irrespective of the other projects we currently
think they would be tied to if they go ahead in those years or not.
Okay. The other thing I wanted to ask about and
I asked yesterday, bike share program because there’s seems to be a disconnect twenty cycling
infrastructure in eastern Scarborough and trying to get bike share to to be more involved.
I have the University of Toronto Scarborough, property owners they are all interested but
when I approach bike share to and say what are you doing they point back to the city
and say there isn’t a lot of municipal bicycle infrastructure.
To me there’s a disconnect there and I’m trying to understand how it could be address.
Thank you for that we can communicate with those running the Toronto bike share program.
Bike share expansion planning so we can have more conversations in that regard.
We look at a range of different things.
We certainly as I mentioned previously look at use because it implies it’s a good route
for cycling. We look at, I much more critical issues related
to latent demanned. That would be the potential?
Correct. And then we’re looking at that delta between
existing demand and potential or latent demand as well when we look at where to put them.
Yes we look at the transportation tomorrow data which demonstrates cycling trips as well
as potential demand and transit access and safety and equity.
That’s very clear. We’re looking at that.
I wanted to talk a little bit about active transportation versus the idea of traffic
calming. We’re talking about a warrant process for
stop signs. We talk about a warrant process for speed
humps. Does transportation services look at active
transportation or connectivity differently than they look at traffic calming?
I recognize that bike lanes have the added benefit of traffic calming in some instances
but is there a different lens for specific traffic calming measures like speed humps.
Through the speaker, yes. While the warrant process is quite distinct
to each tool we’re looking at for traffic calming or stop signs and it looks at a variety
of localized issues related to volume and crash rates and speeds.
As I mentioned previously the cycling and active transportation is typically better
served looking at a network wide basis. Where while there’s local as well, some of
sit related to land use and transit access and connectivity with other modes as well
as volumes. Do we take a network approach when we’re looking
at expand organize building new roads? Through the speaker, I don’t think we build
a lot of new roads anymore. Right, but if we would, if you are building
a road, are you looking at connectivity with existing roads?
I know we don’t have a lot of green field in Toronto for sure.
Sometimes a lane way goes in. You are look at that connectivity.
We are and we’re looking at access. If it’s a new property going in where you
have a brand new development and you need look at access that’s a situation where we
might nut a new road to connect. Do we have a warrant process for that.
They would go through an environmental assessment process that looks at factors at a grander
scale. Do we have a warrant process for sidewalks
when we are putting in sidewalks? No, we don’t.
We have a sidewalk installation policy approved by council that says major arterials would
have them on the both sides and locals on one.
Is it fair to say we’re talking about connectivity, roads sidewalks, bicycles, active transportation
the message here is connectivity? Absolutely.
Thank you Councillor Bradford . Councillor Wong-Tam you have questions?
Thank you very much. Thank you staff for the report.
I’m curious to ask if you can unpack the equity statement for us a little bit more.
I pay attention to all the equity statements within every single report and I found in
this case you have put in a lot more language can you explain to us how putting an equity
lens over the cycling network can achieve greater safety and inclusion for residents
of Toronto. Through the speaker, thank you for that question.
I think it’s critical and important that we’re looking at communities we serve when we’re
making investment in infrastructure and the equity lens we spoke about yesterday is an
excellent piece of making sure we’re doing a consistent scan related to communities.
He — we wanted to make sure that we brought that down to the level of infrastructure investment
where people with the highest need to be kel served.
One challenge was balancing serving existing command.
We need to make sure we’re serving equity seeking groups and vulnerable residents in
the city. The way it’s designed and integrates into
the community is a key way to make sure that people have opportunities to — and mobility.
When infrastructure is not — when infrastructure is not properly integrated it has the potential
to have unintended consequences. We looked at the way the cycling network served
neighbourhood improve areas and how to better serve that particularly with multimodal trips.
We went out to every neighbourhood planning table and sat down and talked to the communities
who represent the areas at that table to talk about what barriers they have to cycling and
active transportation generally and what destinations are important to them.
If we were to take that work and deeper analysis and drawing conclusions to and overlay that
with the cycling network plan, by implementing the plan as quickly as possible.
By targeting the priority designated strong neighbourhoods it could be an equalizer.
You can bring more people into — it is I want to point it gives the ability
for whoever — there’s lots of people for many years implementing this plan.
We want the lens baked into the decisions. So I don’t need to move other motions it’s
already in there? That was our explicit intention.
Thank you. We’re always talking about rushing to the
next waiting post. With respect to what can move it faster through how do we deal with the other factors not
until the report mainly ecs coordination with respect to moving through with a bigger, broader
consultation can with know is important and we’re going run into this conflict.
How do we make sure we get this done? Through the speaker, I think we’ve done some
assessment about lessons learned about the pace of delivery and some of the coordination
challenges through the first few years of cycling plan.
We feel like we have applied new strategies to better tackle the implement pace to improve
the capital coordination as well as engagement with communities.
We think that the plan in terms of what it’s intending to deliver within the next three
years is 120 kilometres of of cycling infrastructure is quite a step forward.
It’s specific in terms of which routes are identified and what major cities are delivering.
You are fairly confident you hit that Mark. We’ve had cycling plans before.
We’ve had ambitious strategies and quantums that speak to large routes but we have not
always hit our outcome. It’s our ambition and target to do so.
We know we need. Addressing everyone individual’s concerns.
We think together with the partnerships of the community stakeholders and Councillors
that we can deliver that as staff. Thank you.
Councillor Carroll. Thank you Madam Speaker.
I want to follow on the questions Councillor bradded for asked.
I hope they were listening to the questions. I wanted to fog on.
That like using an ea system instead of a warrant system to build a new road.
For building a bike path you have committed that you do look at who is already on it to
some extent. For a minute let’s presuppose that we had
a warrant process. I’ll lose a local road.
Sheppard avenue in ward is in need of study before we can proceed with it.
There’s no question that it connects to a lot of trails.
It connects to roads used in the network plan. But I wonder if you could tell me what — talk
to me about the dangers of deciding that on the basis of a warrant system.
If I had a — if there was a warrant system and I needed a certain number of bikes to
be on that road to get staff to recommend that road, in your professional opinion should
I as a politician say to my residents, it’s a very dangerous road.
You are going have to get your bike on it or you can’t give you a lane?
I think it’s a challenging proposition through the speaker because some of the roads we’ve
introduced cycling facilities on in recent years had very low cycling volumes before
the tracks were installed because they were inhospitable before the lanes were changed
having a — to ride the route to get the demand. I don’t think it’s a safe approach to take
for major arterials. Similarly, Don Mills road runs through my
ward and carries on down. It could be relief line north.
We could have above rail. If you do study there you take into account
future transit, et cetera, et cetera. As part of equation of designing the transit.
As part of equation of making it a part of network as opposed should I call my residents
now and say start circling all the way — cycling down Don Mills road to rush-hour so the transit
will include a bike lane. Some of the arterials will require major reconstruction
in order to achieve a separated cycle track as part after this cross section.
It’s a complete streets approach. Eglinton connects is a great example of that
where council had the foresight to plan for the transit project and we’re in the detailed
design of it. That could start construction and no sane
person would cycle on it for years until that transit project was done.
So if you put a warrant system in place, I could actually never meet it in a million
years until that transit is done and then it would be too late to add the cycling lane
would that not be the outcome of a warrant system.
That would be one of our fears of a warrant system.
It’s a cute saying but it’s often said in the field that you wouldn’t plan — determine
if a bridge was needed by counting the number of people swimming across a river.
It’s a similar scenario. I hate to keep belying this point — belaboring
this point. Let me know about if the rational is right.
For pedestrians we can use the system because they are using human leg power.
They have to use the shortest route. Sadly they might use an unsafe route.
But a cyclist has choices. If a route is unsafe they probably are going
to go to the other street even though for connectivity the unsafe street if we put the
infrastructure there is the one. Warrants work for in a way that he don’t for
cyclists. Am I getting that right?
It’s an interesting point. Given the changes we’ve made to the warrant
process we know that we actually need to take a deeper look at the way the warrants serve
pedestrians so they serve them better. We need revise what were the old school warrant
systems about you need this number of pedestrians because smieps we can’t rely on that from
a safety perspective and different the difference that may be still a safe location even though
it doesn’t meet the old school warrant. That’s why we changed our warrants for pedestrians.
Thank you. I’m clear now.
Thank you, Madam Speaker. Thank you.
Councillor Holyday. Just to remind members we’re doing 11 and
12 at the same time. Thank madam speak — thank you, Madam Speaker.
I wondered if I could get clarity of what we’re considering in this report and the how
attachments relate to the recommendations. First attachment I wanted to ask about was
attachment number one. Do I have this right that the recommendations
in the report are suggesting that council adopt attachment one which is a map as our
vision as to whether all of the cycling infrastructure should go over time?
You’ve taken time score these routes. Do I have that right?
Through the speaker the map as attachment one is an ultimate network concept.
Not every route shown on that map is meant to be conducted.
Some are parallel and need be reviewed to which one better served the route attachment
one is a summary of all those that scored in a minimal scale and wouldn’t propose that
that entire network is installed. I don’t understand that because the recommendation
that was put in the report. Says City Council endorse the cycling network
plan as outlined in this report and mapped as the proposed cycling network and near term
program in attachments one and four. I guess as a member I’m struggling with this
because I’m asked to vote and endorse this. The next few words in that particular recommendation
indicate that that would be the framework for bringing forward cycling infrastructure
project s and the strategy goes up in parallel. Each project needs to come forward for council
for approval. In no way does this plan looking for council
endorsement give us authority to install a single bike lane.
Attachment four is more complicated it goes into the work you are going to do.
If I got it right, it speaks to a lot of work. Some is great and some I got concerns with
and some of the things included are studies for infrastructure on places like Bloor street
and Yonge Street and many smaller projects. We’re telling you go forth and do a study
or build the infrastructure you articulated in the map.
It’s a study to assays feasibility and — assess feasibility and seek council approval to build.
There’s no approval to build. This identifies the work plan for 19, 20 and
21 in which we bring routes through council approval process and back on your table to
consider. We’re asking to you make effort to create
project and go out and consult and redesign. Council would want to be careful for what
it’s directing you to work on, right? We met with almost all Councillors to go through
what is proposed in each ward. So we’ve vetted this quite carefully and we
clarified which are tied to other projects in the program.
Through the speaker, sorry Councillor Holyday, part of approach we’ve take money in look
at a comprehensive network like we’ve done is to give council a data driven and neutral
approach is to how to propose and build out this network for your consideration.
The last is attachment number two talks about major city wide cycling routes.
We’re going to endorse this map in. There it talks about doing a study in the
short term and maybe long term. That’s correct.
It identifies in red the study in the 2019. 2021 program as well as future studies required.
Attachment — back to attachment one. It essentially in my observation really is
an overlay. If I can please have quiet in the council
chambers, please. Members of council, staff, please?
Thank you. Attach one looked at — if I can finish the
question if it’s okay. Attachment one over lays desire lines essentially
and shows based on a whole bunch of scores the idea of where the cycling infrastructure
could go because of desire and analysis. And to me, it looks awfully like a lot of
busy streets in the city. Cars on those streets, people on those streets,
bikes are on those streets. If you can add comment in the report it talks
about you use the survey and take a percentage of consisting car trips.
Is it 66% of those with the assumption that those would become — attachment one is the
result of scoring of our process. We looked at the 2016 cycling plan proposed
routes, routes in the 2001 bike plan. We looked at routes defined for cycling as
parts secondary plans. We took feedback from consultation we received
in the first cycling planned route. We did analysis based on the current demand,
phone — potential demand and all others earlier and scored them on how they fared.
That is what is demonstrated on map one. The 66% metric is to not overestimate demand.
It’s not that 66% of vehicles would switch to cycling.
It’s looking at the amount of trips within the — that are taken by transit and by vehicle
currently within a five kilometre raider only and takes a 66% of the mode share in that
area to understand potential demand. We’ve been conservative to not overestimate
that. Thank you.
Councillor Fletcher? I know this isn’t about new but I’m very interested
in the current cycle lanes and how you have your maintenance schedules.
They are regular maintenance schedules and repainting.
How often the pot holes that are in all of the cycle lanes do you do anything special
from transportation or are those simply when the roads are paved.
As part of plan in 2016 we had a renewed component which looked at the existing quality and that
is through things like repainting lines, green marking and making them consistent with today’s
standards. As part of vision zero plan invest the
surface maintenance is done through the state of good repair program as well as through
it’s on a proactive and response to complaints basis.
The understanding could be that all of the cuts that iew at this times — utilities have
made and paved over or taken out in order to do a permanent that reviews for dangerous
surfaces outside of what is going on the main road we have a pone comment of vision zero.
There are corridor specific enhancements and checking for safety concerns in terms of pot
hole review. It’s not a separate cycling crew, no.
There’s nobody that looks at you could agree with me it’s one thing to go over — excuse
me Councillor — it’s one thing to go over a pothole in your car or large bump or some
kind of mar in the pavement it’s another thing to good over that on the bicycle.
Would you agree? I would agree and I also wanted to indicate
that we have a team of maintenance throughout the city and travel the roadways and report
back on impacts to cycling facilities. We’re keeping eyes out for that.
We tend to get lots of feedback from cyclists and people using those routes because they
are on the ground and doing that. Do you think the standard that you said is
high enough? Through the speaker I think there’s always
better that we can do in themes of sate of — that we can do in terms of state of good
repair. It’s one of reasons we’re paying close attention.
Pot hole maintenance is critical and important but it’s a short term fix in doing more repair
work getting a smoother outcome is critical for cyclists.
Do you have a crew that goes out and simply smooths the current and existing bike lanes?
Through the speaker, we do not. But could you?
You could have a dedicated group that ensures cycling.
I would expect that to be everybody’s job in the division who is doing maintenance repair.
I think it’s important that we get to that point.
You. That’s small vehicles or transportation devices
that are very different than a four Wheel-Transportation. I would agree that the impact is more significant
and we don’t have a dedicated crew to do that work.
Would you be open to looking at that? I would.
Thank you. Thank you.
Councillor Crawford. When you install bike lanes what sort of work
do you do or follow up work that you do in studying the effectiveness of a bike lane
on a road? Through the speaker it very much demands on
the nature after this street. Sometimes it’s a local street and not very
much I — impact and we know it’s working well.
We address issues on a complaint basis. There’s other streets with extensive planning
and evaluation in the case of woodbine or Bloor street, we do things as much as counts
of motor vehicles and cyclists beforehand on that street and alternate streets.
We look at vehicle travel time. The level of monitoring and evaluation, there’s
based on nature of project. With regard to — when you are looking at
you install a bike lane, thank you for mentioning woodbine because I’ll refer to that do you
look at number one the increased car congestion. Do you look at the traffic infiltration in
the local community, the environmental impacts of the idling of cars sitting around for a
long time? Do you look at those impacts and, again, I
use woodbine as an example on recommending any changes, number one to the community,
but changes to impact the safety concerns? When you look at just a safety concern, yes
it’s safer for cyclists but do you look at the safety concerns in the local roads with
the increased traffic driving around? Yes, in the case of woodbine even though it
was not a pry lot project we did before counts of motor vehicles on woodbine and neighbourhood
streets. We did after counts, travel time surveys of
vehicles of how long they are taking ton get down the corridor people having challenges backing out and we
adjusted sight lines for where the bike lanes started adjacent to driveways.
Certainly even when it’s not a pilot project on major projects we take an approach with
we evaluate and we evaluated before and afternoon. With regard to, I say you make changes and
understanding what is happening. I was on woodbine yesterday, all week in fact.
It is still unbelievably congested. And if you are suggesting you made changes
to make it better I’m not seeing that. In that participate, when you look — purpose
when you look at that, where do you go — more specifically on the transportation side, the
safety, on, you know on roads when you have that kind of congestion and frustration from
motorists trying to get through. How do you reconcile that with the installation
of a bike lane? As I said it’s safer for cyclists but much
more dangerous for pedestrians and people on the road.
In the case of woodbine our after study saw we had less than a minute on morn and mid
day. I recognize that now this week, last week
is probably a heightened demand to use woodbine and more congestion because of the closures
on the Don Valley Parkway. There’s multiple closures related to work
happening. I would suspect that woodbine is an overflow
route for that traffic. We do look at those and make adjustments and
we’ve seen improvement to thank you. Thank you.
Thank you very much.
Through to you staff, I think Deputy Mayor Minnan-Wong was asking about warrants in terms
of determining whether or not the bike lanes were need and whether or not you tested that
and if you put them in they weren’t utilized and so on.
I was out of the room so I didn’t hear your answer to that.
So whether or not you would go back and make a review as to whether or not they would stay
in place if they are not utilized. Through the speaker we don’t have warrants
for the installation of bike lanes and facilities. Part of the way we approached the plan the
way we approached it is because we’ve done a thor thorgo — once we build it we sent
to see a significant amount of growth. Okay.
So we wanted to indicate that existing cyclists are not a good indicator of what the network
connectivity can yield in terms of cycling safety and cycling nuns.
Right. I know and understand that there are plans
afoot coming forward for more bike lanes and Lawrence avenue particularly across Victoria
Park towards Brimley road. I’m wondering whether or not the plans include
a physical separation, a barrier of some time that I see in many places.
I’ve seen in China, Montreal, New York and many other places.
I don’t see some of them in Toronto. I’m wondering what are the plan there’s and
whether or not I need to move a motion here. Because if you are put them on Lawrence avenue
I would like to see a physical separation, a barrier that protects the cyclists in a
much more safe manner. Based on the speed and volume of car traffic
on Lawrence we would recommend a separated cycling facility or track.
That is what we would bring forward for consultation and approval.
Similar to your request that is our proposal we bring a facility forward for review and
council approval. Okay.
I guess my final question and this one is a touchy one because I think 12 years ago
I moved a motion about licensing cyclists and so on.
I’m not suggesting we’re doing that. I’m simply asking.
I’m asking the question: What exactly would be required if we were to look at that.
Hive numerous complaints about near misses and in some Councillor car — Karygiannis’s
ward, a woman was killed knocked by a cyclist riding on the sidewalk.
Question was, well, can we license them? We looked some time ago and the answer was
not a good one. I’m wondering if technology evolved in such
a twoi allow us to have a greater understanding in terms of how to know who is riding and
whether or not there’s any opportunity to look at that.
As you’ve mentioned, council has looked at this and staff have done reviews several times
in the past. I’m into the wear of any major city in North
America or in the western world that does license cyclists today.
Could be challenging and costly. It would cost more than you would receive
in funds from license fees. If it were something to be nfer taken it’s
better in the purview of the province like a driver’s license.
It’s not something police feel they need. The police have reviewed this issue and indicated
that they have the powers that they need to receive identification and charge cyclists
and they regularly do so. The situation is a challenging one because
when an individual is hit and that person is gone if someone did have a license, would
that person be able to see it. It’s not clear.
I know there’s a few cases where that kind of sidewalk cycling has resulted in a death
or injury. The ones I’m aware of the person has come
forward or been caught. I’m not sure if it’s like.
That we don’t recommend licensing for challenging restrictions, when is age appropriate.
I know they are focused and working on education to cyclists.
What the crux is is around safety and making sure people are sharing the road appropriately.
Education is a critical component of doing. That as we know from driver’s licensing which
happens once in a lifetime or twice that’s not necessarily the best way to educate people
about the daily operation of vehicle on the street.
Particularly if education is taken to the school system.
I know it was in the past. If kids can be taught about the rules of road
from the get-go that would be a best way to achieve safe infrastructure.
Thank you. Councillor Karygiannis.
Thank you, Madam Speaker. Through you to staff, what is there that exists
should an accident happen between a bicyclist and a vehicle?
A bicyclist and pedestrian? And if the bicyclist is at fault, what assurance
is there in order to protect the public? If the cyclist has violated the rules of the
road and contributed to a crash, they are eligible for a ticket or citation or fee or
fine depending on what the Toronto police would indicate their assessment of the situation
would indicate. They are charged in the same way that anybody
would be. The car, a vehicle, if you cause an accident,
you have insurance and your insurance covers the damages that you cause.
If you are a bicyclist and you cause an accident, what insurance is there in order for the other
people that people that got hit or died. My understanding is there’s the situation
if there’s a collision with uninsured drivers. There’s a component of insurance that deals
with uninsured drivers. People the — insurance side is dealt with
in the same way as if an uninsured driver was in the situation.
I am driving I hit somebody. My damages, their damages.
I’m a bicyclist, I hit a pedestrian. Pedestrian has damages, to their self-, to
a property, what is there that the bicyclist, what insurance does the bicyclist have in
order to cover damages? Is there such a thing?
On this point it may be cyclists who has license insurance on the car there mate be coverage
there. The secondary weigh way is the — way is the
pedestrian would sue the cyclist for damages. Most cyclists are also operate cars so many,
in have drivers licenses and insurance coverage and depending on that plan there’s various
levels of coverage. I don’t drive, I live in an apartment, I have
nothing to my name except going to work. I hit that person.
If I’m a driver, I have a car I have to have to insurance.
Does that bicyclist have insurance to cover the damages?
In the same way that a pedestrian wouldn’t necessarily have insurance the cyclist would
not necessarily have to have insurance but they might and individual policies would have
a different approach. Through the staff.
And they designed. Through the chair to staff, with all due respect,
a pedestrian walking down the street, hits somebody doesn’t cause the same damages that
a bicyclist would cause. Is there something mandatory for the cyclist
to have insurance because they are operating a vehicle.
They would be counted as uninsured driver if they didn’t have insurance which many may
not. To clarify if I’m wrong correct me.
Some drive a bicycle f they don’t have insurance the person that gets hit can sue them and
good luck in getting anything from them. That is correct.
Thankfully it doesn’t happen very often but you are right.
Thank you. Thank you.
Thanks speaker. A couple of questions as a urban cyclist.
I think we as have failed in this regard. We don’t have and we don’t think about when
we so integrate and think of the city has a whole.
We missed the wonderful opportunities to build super highways connecting the outer reaches
of the city with the core of city. For those of us who like cycling we build
the little sort of one of — question, question. The question to the staff is when are they
going to save us from ourselves. [Laughter] speak your self- [Laughter] if
the Councillor is asking where we are not planning for rail corridors.
My question is why it we’re not pursuing, not that you haven’t thought about it but
we’re not pursuing building cycle lanes next to rail corridors that connect the city from
one end to the other that make it fast for cyclists and someone like me or like Steven
Holyday who is fit as a fiddle there, to get on his bike from the outer reaches of Etobicoke
and debt down here. Why are we doing all these one-offs, killing
ourselves doing the bicycle lanes that go from nowhere to nowhere especially in the
suburbs and not thinking about doing the big cycle lanes connecting are the city from one
end to the other. It’s a great question and that’s why the attachment
to the major city wide cycling routes is so important.
It’s about designing the major corridors. Many of those on that map on attachment two
are routes along rail corridors. We’re currently working on extension of the
rail path which say trail along the rail corridors well as others.
We’re open to exploring more. There’s challenges with property ownership
and rail lane expansion and rer. There’s safety and the proximity around trails
because of space but we also have existing trails to serve that need which we’re expanding
to serve across the city. One will go from the park to middle east the
trail. And the — meet the trail.
Other corridor across the top of the city. We have plans on the expansion of Gatineau
and a north south route. I’ve been here now, this is going on my fourth
term. And when I — I initially met with you folks
when you first got elected to talk about completing the Humber trail along the golf course south
of Wilson avenue or the 401 rather. It’s going on 13 or 14 years.
You’ve had plans to build these lines along the rail corridors and all of rest of it for
as long as I can remember 20, 25 years and they haven’t moved one iota.
They haven’t moved forward an inch. Other than being like lines on the map and
saying that when are we going to do something about it and bring forward a plan that makes
since and connects its city one end to the other so cyclists can get on their bikes and
get places. Through the speaker, Councillor thank you
for your passionate support of these connections we completed several projects I mentioned.
The Gatineau trail was decked between Victoria and Eglinton.
We completed two sections of the e — Etobicoke. There’s one section of mid-Humber gap that
we hired home it die feasibility — do to a feasibility study of.
We’re work on that and briefing Councillors including ourselves about that within the
next couple of months or and initiating a class assessment to proceed with the construction
of the detailed design and construction. It’s very challenging.
I mentioned the challenges with some of the rail lines but we have been moving forward
on many projects. Councillor Colle?
Thank you. I wasn’t going to speak but Councillor Peruzza
sort of — you are asking questions. I wasn’t going to ask a question because Councillor
Peruzza tweaked my interest here. The question I have: He’s talking about building
cycling path as long north south rail lines and golf courses and everything.
I’m more interested in going east west. You know, if you look at if you look at north
south, where there are more east west connectors across middle Toronto.
Everybody forged about middle Toronto. It’s always downtown.
What about east west I want to go north park green belt in Councillor adams ward.
I can’t get there because there’s a railway. Get in your car and drive there.
[Laughter] the route map identifies Eglinton and Lawrence as key midtown east west connectors
and the trails that you mentioned the beltline trails are critical for local communities.
We’re building in 2019 a segment. We’re going be having a multitrail built.
Stop right there. That’s great but I’m talking about middle
Toronto. I’m talking about the Toronto south of the
401 there. It’s like no man’s land there.
We need some east west connectors across the middle of this city.
I want to get to the wonderful hidden park that Frances has there.
We can’t get it to she’s keeping it separated from us.
I want to get across. Maybe I want it that way.
[Laughter] Frances. [Laughter] her hidden park is her park.
Through the speaker, the key major citywide routes that do the cross city connections
are Eglinton and Lawrence there’s routes in the network plan that you see in attachment
one that make the connection to north park that you are referring to.
There’s two or options. One involves building a new project to connect
to north park and that’s something that is requiring property.
It’s something we have in the proposed plan and we’re happy to work with opportunities
but not within the near term plan right now. The question I like to ask, shouldn’t we perhaps
have some kind of long-term visioning plan whereby we start to look ten years, 20 years
ahead because I know in my ward there on the Yorkdale area there’s a lot of development
proposed. So if we don’t start to have sort of a long
term vision we lose opportunities as the developments go forward to start.
Work with the to protect the greens rights of way cycling routes, east west.
Through the speaker, yes, that’s having a long-term vision is exactly what the cycling
network plan is. It keeps it as a fully long-term vision then
there’s a short term detail for three years. The projects you mentions are in the long-term
plan to protect them and think about them as development opportunities arise.
You have no problem with my motion I’m going move to locate long term connector to Councillor
Nunziata’s hidden park there the north park. That motion is in our plan to look at that.
It’s on map one. I pointed out to where it is.
We have a challenge that it cannot be done within the near term program and that is the
concern that the near term won’t work for that particular project.
Near term is how many years? Three?
Three. So then mine would be how many years if I’m
trying to get to you look at the long term. What I proposed to your staff is I’ve given
wording about a motion that has us reported back at the end of this near term program
about appropriate timing and opportunities for the link so Councillor Layton at Infrastructure
and Environment Committee proposed we report back in 2 slrks 4, 2021.
I suggest we refer to the timing after this project at that time.
Thank very much. Thank you.
Mayor Tory? Mayor Tory to speak?
Thank you very much, Madam Speaker. I have a motion that I don’t have in front
of me. There it is.
I’ve done gone through this exercise. I heard on the raider a commentator telling
me nobody uses those bike lanes at all. My experience is I have to wait four minutes
in the break in the bike traffic to get across the street to get to the radio station.
I felt by having. This is not unique to Toronto.
Other cities have put bike country counting. In Montreal they have great big signs that
count and the count is shown to you as it goes so that you can see there may be bikes
that show there isn’t much traffic that allows us to have that information.
We tend to make better decisions around here when we have this kind of information that
is pretty much unarguable. People are using them or they are not.
I would say with respect to this matter in general, speaker that before my time they
contain a blockbuster number.
I believe and there are others who take issue with that and I’ll come to that in a moment
in terms of situation we faced yesterday in terms of balancing of interest talking about
vision zero that there’s been quite a lot done.
But at the same time if you measured it against the plans presented over time, actually part
of the problem is first of all they are very big, very long and hard to measure we know
what it is we’re approving and it’s easier for doing these things or not.
My intention would be to see us do them as usual with this topic as with many others
and the longer you are here and the more you learn this is the way it is.
I have people saying of my leadership on this and the posture that I’ve taken some saying
we’re doing way too much. As you’ve seen in recent days I’m appointed,
anointed and celebrated as the leader of the latest war on the car which is utter rubbish.
Having said that, I’m anointed by some as that and then there are other people who say
our efforts with respect to bikes are, you know, the bare minimum and not even making
that standard. I’m assuming in terms of steady actually achieved
progress, actually places where you’ve built trails and bike lanes and filled in gaps and
done things that we’re probably in the right place vis-a-vis something I said yesterday
was an important part of how I tried to lead. Which is that I think that you have to try
to get out there as much as you can and do as much as you can to take account of an evolving
city but can’t lose the public’s confidence because if you do everybody in here gets under
pressure and some will acknowledge that more than others exem agree disagree and they have
time to pass judge onl that and more than well is that do.
That as I said, yes, we have to sort of then try to do what we can do to have a plan that
can be measured by people. I think key points I want to look at in point
two, in one bun remaining minute are the following. First there’s three years set forward of specific
projects that enumerated. If they are not done people see with a didn’t
get done as opposed to a ten year and you say that’s year nine and not done yet and
so forth and so on. The second thing in particular and I’m not
trying to boil it down. There’s much in it is that there’s a proceeding
with major projects on the city’s list of items and that is Bloor west April the Danforth.
I think taking next step and moving those forward is a significant step forward that
is something that is going to happen now not seven years from now or five years from now.
I think of a plan and that fill s in gaps. I’m hopeful people end up.
I’m know there’s motions but I hope people support this as something that does those
things moves projects forward and moves two big initiatives forward as well as a selection
of other matters that form this plan. I thank you for your attention and commend
this report to members of council. Thank you.
We do have a question for you. Of course.
Councillor Perks, you did have your name. You took it off?
Councillor Ainslie? Mayor Tory great motion csm we add three words
mandatory open data so they are released in an open data set.
You know what, yes. Because I think we have been when people have
come and asked for great we found reasons —
if you figure the out place where that should go I’m happy to do.
That I think that that should be the by and large the hallmark we set in all cases.
The answer is yes. Thank you, Mayor Tory.
Thank you Madam Speaker. Thank.
Councillor Cressy to speak? Thank you speaker I held the tux let me begin
by thanking staff for their hard work. I would step back to say what is our objective
here as it relates to the cycling network plan.
Our objectives should be pretty damn simple which is in a growing city we need to work
to redesign our streets from in the old days moving cars to in the 21st century moving
people. It’s just that simple.
It’s the only solution in a growing city to shift the mode.
So let me talk about that from a downtown perspective and a city wide perspective.
In downtown, 250,000 live downtown I’m one of them from the Monday through fry the quadruples
to one million people. One million people.
That’s because one-third of all the jobs in the city are located downtown.
Many of of your constituents compute downtown to work.
It’s going continue to crease that pressure because 43 of all the city’s non-residential
development is in downtown. Meanwhile, if you try to drive to city hall
or tried this morning you know our streets are at capacity today and good luck widening
them to bring more cars through and into the downtown.
The only way from a safety stand point that we can move people in and out of core to job
and schools is shifting the mode and redesigning the streets.
That’s it. It’s working.
People have voted with their bike lanes you have to look at Richmond.
Go stand at Bathurst and add laid and see how it’s going.
Go up to Bloor street, when it’s not under construction right now, and you’ll see how
it’s working. On a citywide basis which is where a lot of
debates over cycling infrastructure take place, you have to build a grid.
We have to build a network. If somebody is being on a bike from their
household in the morning they have to be able to ride to the child care to drop their kid
off. Ride to work to their place of employment,
go back to the child care, stop at a store on the way home.
You have to do all of those. You can’t build bike lane.
I would say and commend the near term objectives, next three years, extending Bloor west to
High Park. Let’s get it done.
Piloting a bike lane on Danforth to make the strong east west connection.
Let’s get it done. Studying and bringing university back on line.
Let’s get it done. That’s all important.
I will say and I believe that our medium term plan and target s are lacking because there
are no clear targets or accountability measures to hold us to them.
Over the next three years, we have a work plan so let’s build it.
Let’s address it head and I would support the Councillor’s amendment.
We don’t have warns for sidewalks. We don’t have warrants for whether cars about
be on roads. Why the proposed double stand yard by the
Deputy Mayor? It’s nothing more than a poison pill to create
another reason to say no to building bike lanes in that grid.
Moving people and redesigning our streets. I would close by saying that, you know, it’s
long past time that this chamber, this council moved past the debates of old, the cars versus
bikes false dichotomy. I think last term we put those debates to
bed. Richmond and Adelaide and the Bloor bike lane
gave you data you need to understand in a world class city you redesign streets to move
more people and more people safely. In this term let’s move forward to not just
pilot bike lanes, the data is there, let’s build them as quickly as possible.
Thank you. Thank you.
Councillor Matlow. Through you Madam Speaker, I have two motions
one is to delete number 19 which could would allow for bicyclists who use sidewalks and
number two I’m moving to provide a budget impact assessment completing the network in
the Eglinton connection of 2020 process. I start with the second item.
It’s a bike lane that connects all former municipalities as part of metro Toronto east
west. We have an agreement they are putting together
the street escape sidewalk and bike lanes where there are stations.
Our concern is if we don’t finish our part of it in concertificate with Metrolinx will
do by 2021 we’ll end you have orphan segments of bike lanes along Eglinton that create an
unsafe environment because bicyclists begin and get off and again begin and get off.
And that doesn’t seem rebel resolution given everything we’ve heard is the contiguous networks
is our goal as a council. Number two or the number one to remove the
sidewalk idea. If you look at the Ontario highway traffic
act. While it doesn’t speak to the specific question
it does identify it identifies vehicles. Not one of us would suggest a vehicle, a car
should be allowed to drive on the sidewalk. I can tell you if I was walking down a sidewalk
with my six-year-old daughter or I or any of you had a mobility challenge or pushing
a stroller, in a wheelchair if you’ve got a bad hip.
A young person or senior alike, the last thing that you want is somebody cycling quickly
down a sidewalk. I think it’s unable and something we should
dismiss immediately to. Week to the wider issue.
I, too, like have never really understood why we allow ourselves we allow ourselves
to fall into the divisive debate a cycling network.
I smi of us say we’re worried we’ll get screamed at.
Some others not but that probably plays into some of the things said around here like the
war on this or that. If anything can we all agree we wasn’t people
to be safe. If we all agree we want people to be safe,
then we want to create sidewalks that are safe for people.
And we want roads to be safely for drivers and average she have is when I drive I have
this medical around me that separates me and protects me.
I appreciate that. But a pedestrian and cyclist doesn’t that
v- that. And therefore, I believe we have a responsibility
to create distances and separates to protect people from vehicles.
That’s why we do it for bike and why sidewalks should be for pedestrians.
If we all agree safety is the priority. We said that in the speeches during the vision
zero debate why wouldn’t we consistent and do the same here?
I just find shall I really do find this debate tireless and frustrating and stupid.
I read Mark touhy. I usually don’t but I read what he wrote about
John Tory that the mayor alluded to earlier. Talk about stupid.
That’s just trying to light fires to get people upset and be provocative and you know people
who have absolutely like just looking for attention.
Again, why — just pay no attention to that crap, really.
Thank you. Don’t get scared of it either.
Thank you Councillor Matlow. Councillor [inaudible].
We have questions. Madam Speaker I’m confused.
I’ve seen a couple different motions going up.
I was wondering if we could have them up again, please and ask for a clarification.
Motion number sorrying something about able to right on sidewalks.
Is that one of your motions? No I’m the opposite.
So you don’t suggest we allow baseelists on sidewalks.
His motion is to at least the recommendation. Thank you Madam Speaker.
Deputy Mayor? The committee recommendations, does that motion
say that to have a pilot process to look at allowing cyclists on all sidewalks?
No. Which sidewalks does it propose a pilot project.
It could be the sidewalk my kid is walking down.
Nomad yam chair is, does not the motion say it should be on sidewalks where there’s very
little pedestrian traffic? Isn’t that what it says?
Yeah. So not like Yonge Street and Mount Pleasant
there’s places in the suburbs where there’s virtually no pedestrian traffic.
Is that something you want to encourage. Are you aware there’s streets where there’s
no pedestrian traffic. Do your job.
Animate the sidewalks, have development that has great retail along the streets.
Have safe sidewalks, great bike lanes and correct the mistakes of poor planning.
Point of privilege. Councillor Matlow, please, please he’s asking
a question. He said do your job.
He’s inferring that I’m not doing my job. Exactly that’s what I was going to do.
Can I please have an apology. Councillor Matlow could you apologize and
retract that comment. I weent poll guys but I’ll retract it.
You are retracting. I’d like an apology Madam Chair.
Would you apologize Councillor? I don’t believe any of us are doing our job
if we don’t — if we’re suggesting that because there are fewer — [everyone spee speaking
at once] Councillor Matlow, I’m asking you could you please apologize.
You said do your job. Councillor, please, please.
Thank. Councillor Matlow, please.
I just — I don’t — it would be dishonest because I won’t believe it.
Just do it for god’s sakes. I retract it but I don’t believe he is doing
his job as a representative that should focus. Madam Chair.
Councillor I’m being sin tear with you. You are going too far.
I’m asking you to apologize. I’m going to have you to leave if you don’t
apologize. I can’t do it with sincerity.
You have to do what you have to do and I respect that but I can’t.
Okay. Next speaker Councillor Bradford.
Thank you. I rise and I’ll be supporting the mayor’s
motion. I think that’s a great idea as well as Councillor
Matlow’s and Councillor Layton’s motion forthcoming. I don’t think this should be a conversation
that is about click bait. I think it’s time for Toronto to grow and
prioritize safety and active transportation and do it in a thoughtful and smart way.
I do want to give thanks to our staff here. Barbara, Jackie, Katie, Isabell and others.
I think it’s a challenging thing facing Toronto and it feels like an effort pushing that boulder
up the hill. We are making real progress and we are moving
forward. We had a good plan for the city and staff
have done something difficult and challenging at time and that is recognizing how things
are going and providing us with the advice we need to recalibrate and retool.
That’s a pragmatic thing in my mind understanding what hasn’t been working and charting a new
path forward. The network plan update we’re voting on today
is asking us to stay firm in our goals of creating a strong citywide network that meets
the needs of all road users that is the point of if a embassies.
We’re talking more and more — emphasis. We’re talking about vision zero and taking
agency on those items. It gives us a way to strategically deliver
our highest priority. I’ve always net not all — said not all bike
lanes are created equally. In some areas there’s demand and other areas
less so. I think we should focus on driving efforts
and resources on time to bike lanes getting the most people using them.
While I and some of my colleagues here are fully ready to embrace a city wide network
not everyone community is. We need to take the time to do the consultation
and engagement to bring people along with us to set us up for success.
We can point to examples in the City of Toronto where that has not happened, where it hasn’t
gone well and that’s when it becomes controversial. I know that that is a lot of work but it’s
important work we have to do. Just because it’s challenging doesn’t mean
we shouldn’t do it. We ought to and we have to.
The most important reason I’m rising here said to speak on the item because I want to
support my community. We heard from deputants over and over again.
We received 400 correspondence and hundreds of emails on the file.
Every person we heard from made one message very clear: Road safety on Danforth is as
a priority. It’s one of most heavily traveled cycling
corridors in the city that doesn’t have any bike infrastructure to support that.
That makes a lot of sense to me. We heard from our general manager talk about
demand, design and latent potential. Danforth has tons of that.
It’s a critical piece in make the east west cycling connection through the heart of our
city with multibillion transit infrastructure below and some of the most eye iconic neighbourhoods
this makes sense. I want to thank the Councillor for tabling
my motion and call for the design of a bike lane pilot on Danforth.
We come back with staff and move it forward. After 40 years of studies and debates and
delays they gave it support for providing ace path to move forward.
I’m calling for staff to begin the consultation and detailed design work early on the bike
lane pilot now to get started and get it moving. The work starts first and foremost in consultation
with the community, with bias, with residents, with people that use Danforth every day and
work plan is robust. Three interest group meetings monthly steering
committee that we’ll be sitting on. After extensive consultation at that point
we’re presented with a work plan that is thoughtful, smart and makes since to move forward — sense
to move forward. We look at the avenue.
I was throild see Councillor Fletcher joined me in the call.
Having an option for a continuous bike lane pilot across the busiest stretch of Danforth
makes a lot of sense we’re building vital links and I think we heard today when we don’t
have the connections it doesn’t make sense. I’ll wrap up and say we’ve had a lot of success
on Bloor west and I look forward to supporting more success going forward.
Thank you. Madam Speaker Nunziata.
Thank you. I have a motion if I can ask staff to put
it up. It’s on — shh, shh.
Okay. 6.11.
There social security on the screen. — there it is on the screen.
City Council requests the general manager of transportation services to review opportunities
to prioritize western connection cycling routes with a near term imp thation program and cycling
network to the west and going up be included as part of this work and two City Council
request a gm of transportation services to consider including Jane Street south of 401
to Bloor street west as study plan for major cities as cycling route as part of next report
back on the implementation progress of the cycling network plan.
Staff helped me with this motion. I just to speak in the support of both items
11 and 12. We also spoke Metrolinx asking when they designed
the corridor that they allow space for a bike lane as well.
They agreed to. That I don’t know if they are going to do
that or not but that was what we recommended and we also put a motion through council a
couple years ago on that corridor going north and south.
So there’s a dedicated bike lane going in my ward now and actually it’s being corrected
now scarlet road. For people that know that area, it’s been
a highway for many, many years. It’s four lane, four-lane traffic and no stops.
Motorists are going 90, 95 down the hill and up the hill.
So part of the city is reconstructing the road as with as putting in the sidewalks.
Part of that is to reduce the lanes to two lanes.
Then in the future, we’re doing the paths at St. Claire and Dundas and that is part
of ward as well. Widening the underpass.
I did have a community meeting with my residents which we had quite a few residents.
I have been communicating to my community for a number of years that this is in the
works and that will happen when scarlet road gets reconstructed.
So there’s been communication from my office to my community on its proposed project.
And I believe that dedicated bike lanes, I prefer having dedicated bike lanes or not
having any bike lanes at all. I feel it’s safer for motorists, pedestrians
and cyclists. When you are driving.
Dundas is — they don’t have dedicated bike lanes and it’s unsafe for motorists as well
as pedestrians. So in areas where, you know, I think there’s
certain areas of the city that it warrants and I think the community is embracing it.
And the question was asked to staff, do you count the cyclist, how many cyclists do you
have on a particular street ba before you recommend it — before you recommend it?
There are some areas that there not be cyclists because it’s unsay.
Why would you use the road if it’s unsafe for you?
The criteria can’t be on the number of cyclists because there are roads very unsafe and I
don’t believe toward attempt — they would attempt to use those roads.
If you build them and it’s safer you have them use the roadway.
I will be supporting both 11 and 127 in the recommendations and I hope members of council
support my amendment. Thank you Madam Speaker.
Madam Speaker I’m hoping you can come back to the chair because my colleagues have agreed
I could go next. Councillor Carroll to speak.
I have to step out early to talk about yesterday’s accident.
Madam Speaker, I don’t have a motion. Like you I rise in support the motions that
deal with getting rid of recommendation that we introduce in a warrant system, getting
rid of recommendation that we do sidewalk bicycling pilot.
I’m very much in support of those. I wanted to comment, mad yam speaker — madam
Tory being dubbed the new general in the war on the car.
It didn’t about cars or bikes. It’s actually just about people.
And one of things we have to wrap our heads around in vision zero in the overall network
plan in the specific projects that we’re starting is we’re dealing with very, very different
travelers than what I grew up. Let’s think about it.
Those of us, there’s a fair number of my generation in this room right now, we had parents for
whom it was a big deal buy a car, a car. When my family moved to Don Mills, the biggest
traffic job — jam in the neighbourhood was the wives driving the single car to the corner
where the bus was and all the business men jumped on the Lawrence to 574 and went to
the subway and went downtown to a small cluster of office buildings.
That was 60s. And all the arteries were lovely fast roads.
We thought sooner or nation we’re going to have affluent nation and bomb have big cag
r cars — two — and nation and everyone would have two cars and we need bigger roads.
But that’s not what my children are doing. I have a daughter in her 30s who lives downtown
and doesn’t want a car. When she’s walking the streets she’s or the
of remembers when I taught about her perspective of the car driver but she doesn’t have that
perspective. She’s never been the driver.
We have a number of people who are pedestrians. They maybe can’t afford a bike or pedestrian
but own a car and they’ve never cycled down a busy street.
So they don’t have the perspective of the cyclist they are sharing the road with.
They may not own a car and they don’t have that.
Two different types of vehicles are sharing the road with them but they don’t know what
they see. And that’s relatively unique because we used
to grow up assuming woe have the same journey and we don’t anymore.
Some of us will never own a car. Some will never ride a bike but we have to
inhabit the same road network. We have to figure out how to navigate around
buses sharing the road. We need a lot of those because god knows when
the rail is built that we’re anticipating. But then it’s built and navigating around
that construction. That’s what this plan has to accommodate.
It’s why I refuse to say let’s have a warrant system.
Let’s have a warrant system for bicycles and then if anybody phones me and says I want
a bike lane on this route, I will say I don’t care what that road is designed for, get on
it. I want you to get a bike lane, pedal on it,
start riding right now. The parent says this is crosswalk is unsafe
and we’re worried a kid will be killed I need a crossing guard.
Would I say, throw your kids in that street? Get them in there.
I need x number of kids. That’s not working for us now.
When I asked the question the transportation director said in some respects we use warrants
for pedestrians but we’re examining that because it’s a way to address unsafe conditions.
They are retreating from that the only thin the warrants do really work for are cars because
in a collision of three types of travelers, walkers, cyclers, drivers, generally speaking
— the person — because they are all people — the person behind the wheel has the greatest
chance of winning. Thank you.
Thank you. Okay.
Deputy Mayor Minnan-Wong, Councillor Matlow has approached me and he would like to apologize
to you. Councillor Matlow.
With feeling though. Well, would like to is an overstatement but
I feel that I must. Come on Councillor.
In order to be able to vote on an item I care about.
So I apologize to you Councillor Minnan-Wong for the comment that I made earlier with regard
to doing your job. And everything else that I may have said or
thought about him today in the past or in the future.
In the future? Okay.
Okay. Deputy Mayor Minnan-Wong.
Thank you. Okay Councillor Pasternak to speak.
Thank you Madam Speaker. I have a motion related to a long-term request.
I don’t think you need me to read this but it’s important in any kind of cycling plan
to have connectivity. This motion addresses some of the key requests
that have come over the years. I hope in this iteration of circling plan
we can do so. I would like to thank staff for the report
and the work on the file. And there’s no doubt that we can go down this
road because of an enormous and cultural or paradigm shift within the local communities.
There’s been a growing acceptance of cycling because of the growing demand for off street
trails, segregated bike lanes and more public consultation.
We’re not imposing bike lanes we’re asking communities what toward like to see designed.
I think it could be said that he new comers to our city are bringing a culture of cycling
in their home conners. Boomers are seeing that their millennial kids
are not buying cars, getting their license and are in fact et buying bikes and biking
around the city. Of course, increasing congestion across the
city makes a bike practical and efficient mode of transportation.
Certainly when I’m biking around york centre and ward six it is much easier to get around
by bike than often driving. I think when you look ahead if we want biking
to be a citywide thing then we have to share. That brings me to bike share when I understand
is a Toronto parking short program and not necessarily out of transportation whenever
the inner centers ask we’re told the volume is not enough.
They may build up d.c.s. When I asked about a connection I was told
they are collecting d.c.s to do the connection. When I asked how long it would take they said
ten years. That doesn’t seem fair.
That doesn’t seem reasonable and doesn’t seem like a good way to promote cycling.
I think also we have to make sure we understand where the terrific is in cycling.
In this fas rating report of the office of chief coroner of Ontario which looked at cycling
death review, looked at all accidental cycling defies in Ontario from toism 2010.
I think we can learn a lot from some the hypothesis and recommendations.
Cycling deaths occur more likely during spring and summer.
Cycling debts are more likely to occur to those not wearing helmets.
They are more likely to occur when the cyclist or driver involved with a collision is using
a mobile handheld device. Cycling deaths are more likely to occur when
more or more persons involved are under the influence of alcohol or drugs and the vast
majority are preventable. We can put millions of dollars into the infrastructure
and we’re approving that today. I think the plan going forward is ambitious
but it should be fair. It should be connecting unconnected routes.
It should be going to the inner suburbs we must also focus on the safety.
Public education is really one of key things many making sure or school aged children and
adults understand the rules of road, safety and by-laws and strategies going forward.
Therefore we can build a cycling culture based on good infrastructure, good education and
good safety. Thank you.
Thank you. Councillor Colle to speak.
I have a motion the City Council consider the feasibility and timing of a pedestrian
and cycling bridge at bentworth over the rail line in order to connect the bay crest area
to north park and as part of report proposed for 2012-2-1 to — 21 to update the committee
on the progress. I’m moving this because as representing the
middle of Toronto, the area of Toronto that doesn’t get the intra2rur it wants I thought
it would be a way to high light the node to invest in future cycling network invest.
S in anest west manner south of 401. I know the report here talks about the very
important contribution and investment in the Danforth cycling network.
That’s great. Reality is most cyclist are in the downtown
core of city. We need to start investing in future cycling
lines and cycling and networks east and west in the middle of the city.
In the future, we will benefit by that rather than everybody be car oriented because they
don’t have an alternative. That’s what this motion starts to do.
If we don’t start the long-range planning, if you look at the development occurring in
the Yorkdale area, we’re going to lose opportunities to protect rights of way that will connect
communities through cycling rights of way in the years to come.
I want to put it forward and give ate tension now — did you get it attention now.
I’m talking to some people looking at future developments in that area and they are willing
to put land aside for cycling lanes but if we don’t you know work with them we’ll lose
the opportunities. So I’m trying to do this with this motion.
I’m also trying to break down another east west barrier.
Right now we have an incredible thanks to kay Gardiner, we have the kay Gardiner belt
line used by cyclists and walker and joggers. It ends at the great wall.
There’s a wall. The Allen expressway wall that divides the
community, makes it impossible for foam get from one — foam get from one side — people
to get from one side of the other to the other side.
We have another request later on where by to break down that wall and get people to
connect from the kay Gardiner belt line to the york belt line trail which is an excellent
cycling path, walking, jogging path that goes east to west.
Many people who live on the east side of the wall have never been to the other side of
the wall to balk or talk or visit the great park extended to Marley avenue because there’s
a wall there. I’m asking for possible cycling connection
walking, jogging connection that finally gets ride of divide.
We have our own wall through the middle of city called the Allen expressway.
I’m trying to break down that barrier there so we get people walking, cycling, going on
strollers across that part of city which has been divided by that great big mistake called
the island expressway which has destroyed communities for years and still destroying
it. So I think the key thing is for us to look
ahead, breaking down barriers and going east and west rather than just along rail lines.
That’s fantastic. We don’t have enough east west connectors
in the middle of the city that is the underbelly of Toronto.
Everybody forgets about underneath the 401 where people don’t have enough opportunities
to cycle, don’t have opportunities to get cross those walls, the barriers which divide
communities and make it easier to get into cars rather than getting into — on to their
bicycles or walk organize jogging. That’s why I put forth this motion.
Thank you. Thank you.
Councillor Ainslie. Thank you Madam Speaker, I have a motion I
would like to move that City Council request the general manager of transportation services
to work with advice chair of Toronto to develop a coordinated plan to install bike share infrastructure
across Toronto. I want to thank Mayor Tory for agreeing to
the friendly amendment to his motion around open data.
In Ontario they have automated counters on the bike routes to see what the volume is.
Open their open data portal and see what the results of that are.
Before I speak to the motion I would like to let everybody know google maps made an
announcement this morning. Google maps is tracking our bike stations
in front — Toronto, bike share Toronto stations. You can to google maps live this second to
see the availability of bicycles in each station in Toronto.
Tas announced which is great news for the bicycling infrastructure in the city.
With regards to my motion, one of the concerns that I have, it’s the same that many of my
residents have. It’s kind of reaching out as Councillor Colle
just said from east to west. If you look at the bike share Toronto flam
Toronto they — program in Toronto they don’t have stations east of Victoria Park and Kingston
road. There’s not one station.
Last year I went to the Toronto Parking Authority and I asked for a pilot I have buy in for
metro lanes for all of go train stations. Large property owners.
Centennial College. University of Toronto Scarborough has a bicycle
repair hub on old Kingston road. TCHC announced a hub at Lawrence and orton
park. If you look at the report the area in the
centre of my ward, now it’s in the eastern part of my bard is listed — ward is listed
as one of growing areas for bicycling in the Toronto city.
When I go they say to me the City of Toronto doesn’t have enough bicycling infrastructure.
When I ask staff they said they are working on it they had discussions with bike share
Toronto but I think there needs to be a better connection there because just the request
I had for bike share Toronto last year on social media, his a lot of support for that.
I tweeted it out. I’ve had residents that have said to me why
can’t swre more bicycling infrastructure in my ward?
You if you go to my ward now the bicycling infrastructure amounts to lock rings.
I would like to see more bicycling infrastructure in my ward.
I think it’s a matter of use it and they will come.
My resident want it. And I’m looking forward to working with staff
to see what can be done to increase the physical infrastructure with Toronto and bike share
Toronto. Thank you.
Councillor Karygiannis, I would like to ask members of council, staff there’s so much
talking in here. It’s so noisy it’s hard to hear.
Please, if you can try to keep it down. Councillor Karygiannis to speak.
Thank you. Basically the motions speak to the need for
insurance for bicyclists and I would ask that the city transportation
manager take a look at this and see if this is needed and find ways to achieve this.
If that fails the city set up a fund should people be injured and or property damage we
done — thank you my colleagues for allowing know speak.
Councillor Fletcher, Ainslie, please. Very polite of them both.
Thank you. We do have accidents that have happened with
bicyclists and cars. We have accidents between bicyclists and pedestrians.
We need to make sure we address its issue of should somebody get hurt they are compensated.
If a person is hit and laid off for a couple months or broken leg and steel plate in their
leg with a couple of screws. Not a bike by a motorcycle.
Therefore we should look at the possibility of having Monday — mandatory insurance and
this is tied to your home insurance if you have a house or apartment or something that
the city will certainly look at in order to provide.
So when people are on their sidewalks on the street or crossing the street and they are
hurt we need something that addresses that issue.
Thank you Madam Speaker. Thank you, Councillor Holyday .
Thank you have a motion. It’s a — it’s a request that when matter
come forward that require the removal of a live task lane that the general manager reports
to council first so that we have the foresight that that element is involved in the project.
The reason for that is I appreciate that those types of cycling projects are the most controversial.
I think most Councillors generally support the installation of additional infrastructure,
the adding of painted bike lanes and bol yard s to separate the lanes.
It’s when we get into the discussions about closing down a lane it becomes very controversial.
I would be looking carefully at this report. It’s complicated and it’s long and there’s
a number of maps on the report. I want to make sure that members of council
and the public understand what it is we’re voting for today.
I’ve looked at the map number one in the first attachment and it’s really the seat — set
of desire lines cross the city. Using data where the staff think the cyclists
should go. It should be no surprise.
It mirrors busy streets where the cars are. In surprise part of data was derived by taking
short trips and making an assumption that some of the people will get out of their cars
and use bikes. There’s other pieces in the report that — what
I’ll say about that map is if somebody asks you what is your position on cycling in the
city I think it’s a convenient map to have. I don’t know if you agree with the matters
that have shown on that map. Maybe you will.
Maybe you won’t. But you should pay very much attention to
that. Because that yeel is the vision you are voting
on. The second is map.
I have problems on what is proposed there. There’s corridor studies and focuses on Yonge
Street, Bloor street, Danforth and university and no surprise with the commons I’ve made
in the past, I don’t think there’s the right locations for cycling infrastructure.
There’s other places to be looked at. The final one is attachment number two and
that talks about doing studies in the few. The thing that bothered me about it I went
into attachment number seven it shows cycling volumes and the lowest band is 3-300 people.
What I noticed is some of the proposed area for deeper corridor studies have less than
three cyclists a day and maybe they might have 3 to 300.
If you look carefully even sellments of Bloor street where we’re rushing to study deeper
have the incredibly low volumes. You know, I realize there’s an argument to
be made that if you build it they’ll come but I think the general public understands
maybe what we can intuitively glean there’s not this sudden wholesale change.
I think that is what frustrates them. Listen to Councillor Cressy at the outset
and we have a congested stit. I appreciate that.
— congested city. I walked along Bloor before and after the
lanes were put. I saw not a lot of bike traffic but backed
up cars were the lanes were reduced. I’m not opposed to bicycle infrastructure.
I support the changes except for scarlet road because that’s the closing of a lane.
If you look at the attachment number 7 back to the volumes, you realize that according
to the map there’s less than three cyclists a day.
I appreciate that maybe that’s actually more about filling in lanes and narrowing the road.
I’m not sure that everyone until the neighbourhood is happy about.
That the thing I wanted to leave with people is be careful with what this vision says and
make sure you understand about where you are going to go.
I’m not thoroughly convinces all of these are the right places to put infrastructure.
There may be ways to move forward and I look forward to working with staff but I can’t
support the visions contained in here because I don’t think the people I represent would
support them either. Thank you.
Councillor Layton. Thank you very much Madam Speaker.
I have a motion. Just a sec.
There’s one item I have to do first. I apologize.
Councillor Pasternak you want to get up and amend your motion?
On a point of order the motion I moved earlier in the debate is being slightly revised.
I’ve asked the clerk to make the revisions and recirculate.
Thank you — recirculate. Thank you.
I have a motion that City Council delete infrastructure environment committee recommend 17 and 19.
191 covered in Councillor Matlow’s motion so I suspect that that will be a duplication
and then two that City Council amend environment committee recommendation 18 so it reads they
direct the general transportation services to develop a back end review that measures
usage against defined metrics with a focus on road safety.
I get to the motions in a sefnlgd first I wanted to thank staff for their work on this
item. It’s been a difficult couple of years in cycling
unit with turnover and a reallocate of spending to get some projects done.
I think there’s a general understanding that we needed to get a reset in the capital program
so we could get moving on some really key items that have been on the fable — table
for quite some time. Investing in a bike network is not only an
investment in public health, an investment in climate mitigation and an investment in
management but most importantly it’s an investment in road safety.
We spent hours yesterday debating our vision zero plan.
Hours. This is an extension after this vision zero
plan. Cycling infrastructure saves lives.
Poll off poll public opinion research on top of public opinion research and most importantly
our own experience tells us that when we build bike lanes, people choose to take bikes more.
We heard from Councillor Holyday and I’m disappointed he is here because he’s not — he doesn’t
get that in fact by building infrastructure people come.
On Richmond street we went from 400 cyclists a day to over 4,000 cyclists a day.
400 to 4,000 because of that work. Knew I grew up on the back of a bike.
There’s a tandem bike. There’s a statue now at the water front.
I grew up on the back of a bike. There was one bike lane the martin goodman
trail. It was pretty terrible going down around commission.
There was one bike lane and very few cyclists. A lot of accidents, a lot of people getting
hurt. As the network was built out, as cycling became
a more socialized activity people chose that over the car and public transit because it’s
an easy and fun way to get around. We saw the lanes fill up.
It’s not in every community yet. It took a long time to get the level of cycling
that we get downtown where it’s most convenient. It’s building the infrastructure that helped
us get. There we’re not going to see that growth if
every lane has to have a set of warrants that comes back after its already been proposed
as part of a cycling plan and come back a third when there’s discussion about the removal
of traffic a lane of traffic and then come back a fourth time after its built.
We’re not going to see growth but staff people coming back over and over and over again with
reports about the same thing. We have a bike plan that has determined here
is a network we want to build out. We know what the numbers are showing.
We know that infrastructure will bring more cyclists to the network but most importantly
it’s about creating that network. If we all of a sudden start pulling pieces
out because we don’t like that it takes a lane of traffic or we don’t like that it doesn’t
yet have enough cyclists then we’re not going to end up with the right network out there.
I’ll point out a couple things. I’m be supporting Mayor Tory’s motion.
I’ll also call them the Tory tally towers from now on.
I won’t be supporting. I would urge you not to support Councillor
Karygiannis’ motion about requiring insurance. We’ve been down that road.
Home insurance and renters insurance covers cyclists.
I won’t be supporting that and I certainly hope you won’t Councillor Holyday’s motion
and I don’t know how many types we want to see the same reports on the same projects
but I hope we can avoid it going forward. Thank you.
Councillor McKelvie. I have a motion that they report back to Infrastructure
and Environment Committee as part of transform to. Reporting.
By 205075 trips under 5k are walked or cycled. They have an ambitious target of co2 reduction
levels. We’re doing great on the cycling network and
transform T.O. We could do a better job aligning the strategies so they are informing each
other. In particular Mayor Tory moved a motion looking
at introducing automatic bike count technology so that tbifs us data we can use it calculate
co2 emissions and we can look at it through the network.
This helps us to break down the target of 75% for trips under 5k .
So if we’re collecting this great in real-time kit helping you to into — it can help us
to transform great for cycle T.O. And transform T.O.
Thank you. Councillor Wong-Tam?
Think you very — thank you very much Madam Speaker and thank you for the opportunity.
I have a motion that was preparing and I don’t think it’s ready.
I have one — they have one but there’s a second one on the way.
So if we can stand my speaking time down I’ll be able to come back to it.
We’ll deal wit later on in the — with it later on in the dee day.
Councillor Fletcher time for one more speaker. Councillor Fletcher?
No. Councillor Filion?
Thank you. Briefly what we have before social security
a long term plan — what we have before social security a long-term plan.
There are Councillors that want to plan for the present.
You need look at what you need do and what you need to get there.
When we talk about a cycling network specially outside of — especially outside of downtown
we’re looking at something with incremental change.
It will take, you know in places like Willowdale it will take quite a while until we — until
you change the patterns and get large numbers of people cycling.
And in order you certainly have the conditions that would dhawz to happen.
You have to start with bits and pieces as you reconstruct roads and eventually you end
up with the network. Eventually people who are deciding where they
want to live if they are cycling and they want to take public transit and cycle and
walk will gravitate towards those areas. So the whole notion of trying to do it with
a — some kind of a warrant system that looks only at the present is completely self defeating.
We’re looking into the future and we can anticipate success in the future.
We cannot measure the future success in the present but we know that if we do this properly
we’ll create the conditions which will create the kind of city that we need.
Thank you. Very good.
Okay we’ll recess to 2:00.

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