South Korean President Moon’s state of the nation address to parliament

South Korean President Moon’s state of the nation address to parliament


President Moon Jae-in has addressed the National
Assembly for the second time since taking office. Our chief Blue House correspondent Moon Connyoung
is live on the phone for us with the details. Connyoung, how would describe President Moon’s
second speech in parliament but his very first state-of-the nation on annual budget approval? It was the president’s most earnest appeal
for budget approval before the majority-led parliament. In his second state-of-the nation to the National
Assembly earlier this morning, President Moon Jae-in optimistically outlined a bold agenda
highlighted by social welfare, justice, economy and security. If his first parliamentary address focused
mainly on the need for a swift approval of extra budget, today’s half-an-hour long speech
was more of a general overview of the policies related to all state affairs explaining why
it is that the government is requesting for the roughly 3-hundred-80 billion U.S. dollar
budget for 2018. That’s a spike of a little over 7-percent
from this year. Using powerpoint presentation, the president
throughly reviewed the administration’s policies in security, economy, people’s livelihoods,
social justice and others. Give us a brief wrap up of each, if you can. Well, the entire speeh can be broken down
to three huge chunks. Security, economy and amendment of the Constitution
which he championed during his presidential campaign earlier in the year. On security, the president’s message was:
Not only will South Korea never tolerate a nuclear North Korea, it will never seek to
possess nuclear weapons either. Take note. The president’s vow comes amid the opposition
parties’ call to redeploy U.S. tactical nuclear weapons to South Korea. Mr. Moon established that the government’s
number one goal in security was to establish peace on the Korean peninsula but that maximum
retaliation would be guaranteed in case of any military provocation by North Korea. Emphasized again in this part of the speech
was close coordination with the global community, super strong South Korea, U.S. alliance, AND
that Seoul will not be taking the backseat in dealing with North Korea. Regarding the economy, President Moon again
advocated his policy for “people-centered economy,” stressing that his government is
doing all that it can to drive Asia’s fourth-largest economy back on the right track. Noting that policies aimed at creating an
economy that is people-centerd and innovation-oriented would improve social welfare and people’s
livelihoods, the president stressed that the proposed government budget for 2018 could
be the first step in making that very change. President Moon outlined them as job creation,
greater household income and better public safety and security. Last but not least, Mr. Moon struck a note
of determination for constitutional amendment… rushing lawmakers to begin discussions reminding
them that in order for the amendment to be made, it needs to be put to a national vote
in the upcoming local elections next June. The constitutional revision under consideration
includes giving more power to local governments to guarantee autonomy and political reforms
that ensures more rights for the average Koreans. Daeun.

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